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UK — Quantifying and Valuing the Wellbeing Impacts of Culture and Sport

September 22, 2014 Comments off

Quantifying and Valuing the Wellbeing Impacts of Culture and Sport (PDF)
Source: Department for Culture, Media & Sport

Key Findings

Arts engagement
Arts engagement was found to be associated with higher wellbeing. This is valued at £1,084 per person per year, or £90 per person per month.

Library engagement
A significant association was also found between frequent library use and reported wellbeing. Using libraries frequently was valued at £1,359 per person per year for library users, or £113 per person per month.

Sport participation
Sport participation was also found to be associated with higher wellbeing. This increase is valued at £1,127 per person per year, or £94 per person per month.

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Art and Judaica Looted by Nazis from Jews Still Largely Unidentified; Review of 50 Countries Shows Little Progress Despite International Pacts

September 12, 2014 Comments off

Art and Judaica Looted by Nazis from Jews Still Largely Unidentified; Review of 50 Countries Shows Little Progress Despite International Pacts
Source: Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany (Claims Conference)

Claims Conference President Julius Berman announced that a new report shows that 15 years after the first international agreement regarding restitution of Nazi-era looted art, most countries have made little progress toward returning stolen cultural items to their rightful owners. A survey of 50 countries by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany (Claims Conference) and the World Jewish Restitution Organization (WJRO) shows that two-thirds of the nations that have endorsed agreements regarding research, publicity and claims for Nazi-era looted art have done little or nothing to implement those pacts.

The Claims Conference/WJRO reviewed activity over the past 15 years regarding the identification of artworks, Judaica, and other cultural property plundered from Jews by the Nazis and their allies.While there have been some positive developments since the 2009 Prague Holocaust Era Assets Conference, only one-third of the participating nations have made major or substantial progress towards implementing the Washington Conference Principles on Nazi-Confiscated Art (endorsed by 44 countries in 1998) and the Terezin Declaration (endorsed by 47 countries in 2009). All of the countries are signatories to the Code of Ethics for Museums of the International Council of Museums (ICOM), which calls upon museums to establish the full provenance of items in their collections, but only a minority of museums has actually implemented this Code.

Public Funding for Art: Chicago Compared with 12 Peer Regions

June 10, 2014 Comments off

Public Funding for Art: Chicago Compared with 12 Peer Regions
Source: University of Chicago (Cultural Policy Center)
From press release:

Local direct public funding provided through grants for the arts in Chicago is low compared to peer regions in both total dollar and per capita terms, according to a new report from the Cultural Policy Center at the University of Chicago.

The study tracks direct public funding for the arts in 13 regions from 2002-2012. It provides a nuanced look at how much money comes to the nonprofit arts from national, state and local arts agencies, with an emphasis on the important role of local arts agencies. While most studies of public funding for the arts use appropriations made on the national and state levels and estimates of local expenditures, this report draws exact dollar figures from grant-level data.

20 Federal Buildings Honored as Nation’s Top in Design and Architecture

May 8, 2014 Comments off

20 Federal Buildings Honored as Nation’s Top in Design and Architecture
Source: General Services Administration (GSA)

Today the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) and its private-sector partners honored 20 federal buildings that represent the agency’s best recent efforts in design and architecture at the GSA Design Awards ceremony, held at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington, DC. The GSA Design Awards are the hallmark of the agency’s Design Excellence program, and today’s event showcases top projects and sets new standards for future federal investment.

GSA holds the program every two years to honor the accomplishments of talented federal employees, architects, engineers, landscape architects, urban designers, interior designers, artists, conservationists, and preservationists who create and preserve the nation’s landmarks. The GSA Design Awards recognizes outstanding achievements in GSA buildings across the country.

A jury of private-sector professionals chaired by architect Henry N. Cobb reviewed more than 80 projects for this cycle of the GSA Design Awards. Projects were submitted in two categories—completed works and designs not yet realized—and jurors evaluated entries for quality in architecture, preservation, engineering, art, interiors, urban planning, graphic design, and landscape. Projects that were eligible for the awards were those with approved concept designs or construction completed between 2008 and 2013. The program is open to contract design professionals, artists, and organizations that completed projects for GSA.

USPS OIG — Preservation and Disposal of Historic Properties

April 21, 2014 Comments off

Preservation and Disposal of Historic Properties (PDF)
Source: U.S. Postal Service, Office of Inspector General

The Postal Service did not know how many historic properties it owned or what it cost to preserve them, as required by the National Historic Preservation Act. It did not report the status of historic artwork to the National Museum of American Art, as required by Postal Service Handbook RE-6, Facilities and Environmental Guide, when it sold 10 historic post offices.

The Postal Service did not collaborate with the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation to improve its compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act and did not submit its 2011 status report to the council. The council could help the Postal Service establish covenants to protect historic features and help secure covenant holders to monitor compliance with those covenants. Also, the council could help review public requests to participate in the preservation process. The Postal Service could also use the U.S. General Services Administration — which employs experienced real estate and historical preservation professionals — to assist in the preservation process.

Copyright, Permissions and Fair Use among Visual Artists and the Academic and Museum Visual Arts Communities

March 17, 2014 Comments off

Copyright, Permissions and Fair Use among Visual Artists and the Academic and Museum Visual Arts Communities (PDF)
Source: College Art Association
From press release:

CAA is pleased to announce the publication of Copyright, Permissions and Fair Use among Visual Artists and the Academic and Museum Visual Arts Communities: An Issues Report. Endorsed by CAA’s Board of Directors on January 24, 2014, the report is now available on CAA’s website (here) and will also be distributed in printed form at the upcoming Annual Conference in Chicago.  The report was written by Patricia Aufderheide and Peter Jaszi, professors of communications and law, respectively, at American University; and graduate fellows Bryan Bello and Tijana Milosevic.  Aufderheide and Jaszi are the project’s lead researchers and two of its principal investigators. Their report summarizes 100 interviews of art historians, artists, museum curators, editors and publishers describing issues related to the use of third-party images in creative and scholarly work. The research was further informed by a CAA membership survey on fair use and a review of relevant literature and legal precedents.

This issues report reveals a situation in which uncertainty about copyright law and the availability of fair use, particularly in the digital era, has made many practitioners risk-averse, too often abandoning or distorting projects due to real or perceived challenges in using copyrighted materials. The report was read by the project’s Principal Investigators, Project Advisors, and members of the CAA Task Force on Fair Use, its Committee on Intellectual Property, and a Community Practices Advisory Committee. A full list of these individuals appears as an appendix in the report.

The Gender Gap in Art Museum Directorships

March 12, 2014 Comments off

The Gender Gap in Art Museum Directorships (PDF)
Source: Association of Art Museum Directors
From press release:

  • Across all AAMD member museums, women hold less than 50% of directorships. Comparatively, 48% of CEOs at non-profits with budgets above $1 m are women and 5% of Fortune 500 and Fortune 1000 companies are led by women.
  • The average female director’s salary lags behind that of the average male director. Female art museum directors earn 79¢ for every dollar earned by male art museum directors.
  • The overall disparities in the number of female art museum directors and in their salaries are mostly driven by the largest museums. These museums have operating budgets of more than $15 million and represent roughly the top quarter of AAMD member museums by operating budget. At these largest museums, female directors earn 71 cents on average for every dollar earned by male directors.
  • For the other three quarters of member museums with budgets of less than $15 million, female directors on average earn $1.02 for every dollar that male directors earn.
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