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Female self-employment in the United States: an update to 2012

October 21, 2014 Comments off

Female self-employment in the United States: an update to 2012
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

This article uses data from the Current Population Survey to examine changes in the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of self-employed women over the 1993–2012 period. The analysis suggests that these female workers, who represented about one-third of all self-employed individuals in 2012, have weathered recessions relatively well and made considerable strides in educational attainment and earnings. In addition, they have become more diverse in terms of race, family characteristics, and health status.

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Canada’s Top Entrepreneurial Cities, 2014

October 21, 2014 Comments off

Canada’s Top Entrepreneurial Cities, 2014
Source: Canadian Federation of Independent Business

Historically, and for a variety of reasons, CFIB has found entrepreneurial characteristics to be strongest in Canada’s prairie cities and the urban areas that ring large urban cores. What they have in common is ‘newness’—the prairie economies have only been developed in the past 150 years or so. Only a few generations separate today’s urban prairie residents from their entrepreneurial forbearers. Similarly, suburban entrepreneurs sought the benefits of urban markets already in place, but found outlying areas more conducive to the structure and cost of doing business.

One often sees higher entrepreneurial activity in resource regions as well–although economies there can suffer from wider boom and bust business cycles. Favourable resource development conditions will attract businesses seeking to service increased activity—and, when conditions deteriorate, a strong base of experienced business owners often becomes the primary pillar of community support.

Among major centres, Canada’s overall top-ranked entrepreneurial communities in 2014 fit all these main characteristics. The combined communities of Airdrie, Rocky View, Cochrane and Chestermere that ring around Calgary’s periphery takes the top score of 70.8 out of a possible 100. This area also received the top score in 2012 and 2013. Periphery communities around Edmonton (which include Strathcona County, St. Albert, Parkland, Spruce Grove, Leduc and other smaller municipalities) climbs to second spot. Saskatoon slipped back a little, but still held its place above Saskatchewan’s other major city Regina. Kelowna is not far behind in fifth spot.

Among mid-sized urban areas, the prairie region is also still well represented, including Lloydminster, Fort McMurray, Grande Prairie and Red Deer. Here, the obvious common element is the resource sector, which has offered many new entrepreneurial and development opportunities. Medicine Hat is another Alberta community in the top 10, as are Camrose and Brooks, which are new to the study this year. Another newcomer, Collingwood, is Ontario’s representative in the group, while Thetford Mines and Saint-Georges takes Quebec’s top spots.

Report debunks Canadians’ misconceptions about agriculture

October 10, 2014 Comments off

Report debunks Canadians’ misconceptions about agriculture
Source: Canadian Federation of Independent Business

Farming in Canada isn’t what many Canadians think. CFIB’s report, Realities of Agriculture in Canada – A sector of innovation and growth, debunks Canadians’ misconceptions about agriculture.

According to a recent study commissioned by the federal government, Canadians have many misconceptions about the agriculture industry, including that it’s not innovative, is shrinking, it potentially harms the environment, and that family farms are becoming extinct. Our new report, which debunks these misconceptions, is based on data collected from CFIB farm members who participated in our The State of Canadian Agriculture Survey.

Results show that, in fact, the majority of farmers – 51% – plan to adopt new, innovative technologies over the next three years, and 44% are planning to expand their business.

State of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders Series

October 7, 2014 Comments off

State of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders Series
Source: Center for American Progress

Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, or AAPIs, are a significant factor in the changing demographics in the United States. But the lack of centralized and accessible data has created a large knowledge gap about this fast-growing and influential group. Data about this group have often not been available or presented in a way that is accessible to policymakers, journalists, and community-based organizations.

The Center for American Progress in conjunction with AAPI Data, a project at the University of California, Riverside, have launched a series of reports on the state of the Asian American and Pacific Islanders communities, featuring the most comprehensive research and analysis of its kind for the AAPI population in the United States. The report series will provide an unprecedented look at this community and provide new insight and analysis along various issue areas including: demographics, public opinion, immigration, education, language access and use, civic and political participation, income and poverty, labor market, consumer market and entrepreneurship, civil rights, health care, and health outcomes.

2012 Business Dynamics Statistics

September 30, 2014 Comments off

2012 Business Dynamics Statistics
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

The Business Dynamics Statistics provide annual statistics on establishments, firms, and job creation and job destruction from 1976 to 2012 by firm age and size. These statistics are crucial to understanding current and historical U.S. entrepreneurial activity. The statistics come from a collaboration between the Census Bureau’s Center for Economic Studies, the Small Business Administration, and the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, an American nonprofit organization that focuses on entrepreneurship.
For the first time, this data will be available in the . The API allows more access and easier customization of data products. Developers could use the statistics available through the API to create a variety of apps and tool.

Further information on the Business Dynamics Statistics release can be found at <http://www.census.gov/ces/dataproducts/bds/data.html>.

The Business Dynamics Statistics visualization tools can be found at <http://www.census.gov/ces/dataproducts/bds/visualizations.html>.

Entrepreneurship and Public Health Insurance

September 24, 2014 Comments off

Entrepreneurship and Public Health Insurance (PDF)
Source: Brown University

The social safety net provides financial security for millions of Americans, yet few studies have explored its influence on firm formation. This paper tests whether the State Child Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) affected business ownership. I use three identification strategies to isolate this effect: difference-in-differences (DID), regression discontinuity (RD) and a differenced version of RD that incorporates pre-policy data as a falsification check. Monte Carlo analysis suggests this differencing technique significantly reduces bias and Type 1 Error relative to RD and DID, and the procedure can be applied to a wide range of policy evaluations. I show that the local average treatment effect of SCHIP eligibility was a 29% reduction in the number of uninsured children and a 23% increase in self-employment. I also show that SCHIP increased incorporated business ownership by 31% and the share of household income from self-employment by 16%, suggesting these are high-quality ventures. The increase is driven by both a 12% rise in firm birth rates and an 8% increase in survival rates. I also document a large increase in labor supply, equivalent to 8.8 million full-time workers. The central mechanism is a reduction in the riskiness of self-employment rather than a relaxation of credit constraints. I find no evidence that observable characteristics are unbalanced between treatment and control groups. To the extent that entrepreneurs contribute to innovation, job creation or economic growth, these findings strongly suggest that public health insurance programs have spillover benefits on the supply of firms.

The Small Entrepreneur in Fragile and Conflict-Affected Situations

September 23, 2014 Comments off

The Small Entrepreneur in Fragile and Conflict-Affected Situations
Source: World Bank

This report is part of a broader effort by the World Bank Group to understand the motives and challenges of small entrepreneurs in fragile and conflict-affected situations (FCS). The report’s key finding is that, compared to entrepreneurs elsewhere, entrepreneurs in FCS have different characteristics, face significantly different challenges, and thus may be subject to different incentives and have different motives. Therefore, it is recommended that both the current analytical approach and the operational strategy of the World Bank be informed by the findings that follow. The publication is organized in the following manner: (i) Overview of the Entrepreneur’s Challenges in FCS; (ii) Observations of FCS Firms, Sectors, and Business Environments; (iii) Implications of findings; and (iv) Conclusions and Recommendations. Included are also appendices, boxes, figures, and tables.

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