Archive

Archive for the ‘prescription drugs’ Category

New Hepatitis C Treatments: Considerations and Potential Strategies for States

March 24, 2015 Comments off

New Hepatitis C Treatments: Considerations and Potential Strategies for States
Source: National Governors Association

The National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) convened an expert roundtable to discuss the opportunities and challenges presented by new hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatments and other pharmaceutical therapies known as high-impact drugs. Such drug treatments share the common characteristics of being more effective than prevailing drug therapies, often resulting in a change in clinical practice that includes treating many more people and being much more expensive. Experts participating in the roundtable included state health care leaders, scientists, national health care experts, subject-matter experts from insurance and pharmaceutical companies, Medicaid and corrections legal experts, and senior staff from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). This paper summarizes the expert roundtable discussion supplemented by NGA Center research to flesh out the background information and strategies discussed.

Preference Towards Generic Prescription Drugs Shows A Four-to-One Lead Over Brand Name Medications

March 19, 2015 Comments off

Preference Towards Generic Prescription Drugs Shows A Four-to-One Lead Over Brand Name Medications (PDF)
Source: Harris Interactive

A new Harris Poll finds Americans favor generic prescription drugs over brand name products by a considerable margin. Eighty-one percent of those who buy prescription drugs say they would purchase generics more often than brand name drugs. A 42% subset goes so far as to assert that they would “always” choose to buy a generic drug. Older generations are especially likely to indicate that they would always go with generics (50% Matures, 44% Baby Boomers, and 46% Gen X vs. 33% Millennials).

Meanwhile, this means that only 19% of those who purchase prescription drugs would more often choose to fill their script with the brand name drug, and a mere 6% would “always” choose brand names. It is worth noting, however, that though majorities of adults both with and without children in their households favor generics, the minority preference for brand names is stronger among those with children in the household (24% with vs. 17% without).

Prescription Opioid Analgesic Use Among Adults: United States, 1999–2012

March 4, 2015 Comments off

Prescription Opioid Analgesic Use Among Adults: United States, 1999–2012
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings

Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

  • From 1999–2002 to 2003–2006, the percentage of adults aged 20 and over who used a prescription opioid analgesic in the past 30 days increased from 5.0% to 6.9%. From 2003–2006 to 2011–2012, the percentage who used an opioid analgesic remained stable at 6.9%.
  • From 1999–2002 to 2011–2012, the percentage of opioid analgesic users who used an opioid analgesic stronger than morphine increased from 17.0% to 37.0%.
  • During 2007–2012, the use of opioid analgesics was higher among women (7.2%) than men (6.3%).
  • During 2007–2012, the use of opioid analgesics was higher among non-Hispanic white adults (7.5%) compared with Hispanic adults (4.9%).
  • There was no significant difference in use between non-Hispanic white adults and non-Hispanic black adults (6.5%).

Patient Responses to Incentives in Consumer-directed Health Plans: Evidence from Pharmaceuticals

February 26, 2015 Comments off

Patient Responses to Incentives in Consumer-directed Health Plans: Evidence from Pharmaceuticals
Source: National Bureau of Economic Research

Prior studies suggest that consumer-directed health plans (CDHPs) -characterized by high deductibles and health care accounts- reduce health costs, but there is concern that enrollees indiscriminately reduce use of low-value services (e.g., unnecessary emergency department use) and high-value services (e.g., preventive care). We investigate how CDHP enrollees change use of pharmaceuticals for chronic diseases. We compare two large firms where nearly all employees were switched to CDHPs to firms with conventional health insurance plans. In the first firm’s CDHP, pharmaceuticals were subject to the deductible, while in the second firm pharmaceuticals were exempt. Employees in the first firm shifted the timing of drug purchases to periods with lower cost sharing and were more likely to use lower-cost drugs, but the largest effect of the CDHP was to reduce utilization. Employees in the second firm also reduced utilization, but did not shift the timing or use of low cost drugs.

Innovation for Healthier Americans: Identifying Opportunities for Meaningful Reform to Our Nation’s Medical Product Discovery and Development

February 26, 2015 Comments off

Innovation for Healthier Americans: Identifying Opportunities for Meaningful Reform to Our Nation’s Medical Product Discovery and Development (PDF)
Source: Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN) and Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC)
From press release:

Senators Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and Richard Burr (R-N.C.) today released a report on the challenges to getting safe treatments, devices and cures to patients more quickly and effectively, examining what is working, and what isn’t, at the Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health.

The senators are soliciting feedback on their report as Chairman Alexander and Ranking Member Patty Murray (D-Wash.) begin a major initiative in the Senate health committee —including a bipartisan working group and a series of hearings—to examine the time and cost currently involved with the drug and medical device discovery and development process, and how to better align public policies to support medical innovation.

In the executive summary, the senators write: “This report aims to examine the current process of drug and device development and identify the inefficiencies that stand in the way of a modern development and review process. We take a close and honest look at what is, and is not, working well at the NIH and FDA. We want to know what successes we can replicate, and what failures must be learned from and fixed.”

Prescription Cholesterol-lowering Medication Use in Adults Aged 40 and Over: United States, 2003–2012

February 23, 2015 Comments off

Prescription Cholesterol-lowering Medication Use in Adults Aged 40 and Over: United States, 2003–2012
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings

Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

  • During 2003–2012, the percentage of adults aged 40 and over using a cholesterol-lowering medication in the past 30 days increased from 20% to 28%.
  • The use of statins increased from 18% to 26%. By 2011–2012, 93% of adults using a cholesterol-lowering medication used a statin.
  • Cholesterol-lowering medication use increased with age, from 17% of adults aged 40–59 to 48% of adults aged 75 and over.
  • About 71% of adults with cardiovascular disease and 54% of adults with hypercholesterolemia used a cholesterol-lowering medication.
  • Adults aged 40–64 with health insurance were more likely than those without health insurance to use a cholesterol-lowering medication.

FDA issues new draft documents related to compounding of human drugs

February 18, 2015 Comments off

FDA issues new draft documents related to compounding of human drugs
Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued five draft documents related to drug compounding and repackaging that will help entities comply with important public health provisions. The draft documents are applicable to pharmacies, federal facilities, outsourcing facilities and physicians.

The new category of outsourcing facilities was created under the Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA), enacted by Congress in November 2013 in response to a deadly fungal meningitis outbreak that was linked to contaminated sterile compounded drug products. Drugs compounded in an outsourcing facility that meet certain conditions may be entitled to exemptions from certain provisions of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act), including the new drug approval requirements and the requirement to label drug products with adequate directions for use. Outsourcing facilities are subject to current good manufacturing practice requirements and inspections by the FDA according to a risk-based schedule.

Drugs produced by compounders that are not registered as outsourcing facilities must meet certain other conditions described in the FD&C Act, or they will be subject to all of the requirements applicable to drugs produced by conventional drug manufacturers.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,022 other followers