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Department of Defense 2014 Climate Change Roadmap

October 14, 2014 Comments off

Department of Defense 2014 Climate Change Roadmap (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of Defense

A changing climate will have real impacts on our military and the way it executes its missions. The military could be called upon more often to support civil authorities, and provide humanitarian assistance and disaster relief in the face of more frequent and more intense natural disasters. Our coastal installations are vulnerable to rising sea levels and increased flooding, while droughts, wildfires, and more extreme temperatures could threaten many of our training activities. Our supply chains could be impacted, and we will need to ensure our critical equipment works under more extreme weather conditions. Weather has always affected military operations, and as the climate changes, the way we execute operations may be altered or constrained.

While scientists are converging toward consensus on future climate projections, uncertainty remains. But this cannot be an excuse for delaying action. Every day, our military deals with global uncertainty. Our planners know that, as military strategist Carl von Clausewitz wrote, “all action must, to a certain extent, be planned in a mere twilight.”

It is in this context that DoD is releasing a Climate Change Adaptation Roadmap. Climate change is a long-term trend, but with wise planning and risk mitigation now, we can reduce adverse impacts downrange.

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DoD Announces Recruiting and Retention Numbers for Fiscal 2014, Through August 2014

October 10, 2014 Comments off

DoD Announces Recruiting and Retention Numbers for Fiscal 2014, Through August 2014
Source: U.S. Department of Defense

The Department of Defense announced today recruiting and retention statistics for the active and reserve components for fiscal 2014, through August 2014.

Interim Report of the U.S.-Japan Guidelines for Defense Cooperation Released

October 10, 2014 Comments off

Interim Report of the U.S.-Japan Guidelines for Defense Cooperation Released
Source: U.S. Department of Defense

The United States and Japan today jointly released the interim report of the ongoing review of the U.S.-Japan Guidelines for Defense Cooperation. A full copy of the report can be found here http://www.defense.gov/pubs/20141003_INTERIM_REPORT.pdf.

Hagel Orders Improvements in Military Health Care

October 3, 2014 Comments off

Hagel Orders Improvements in Military Health Care
Source: U.S. Department of Defense

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has ordered improvements in the Military Health System, saying a 90-day review of the system that found it comparable in access, quality and safety to care offered on average in the private sector is not good enough for service personnel and their families.

In May, the defense secretary ordered a comprehensive review of the Military Health System, or MHS, to be led by Deputy Defense Secretary Bob Work.

It sought to assess whether access to medical care in the MHS met defined standards, whether the quality of health care in the MHS met or exceeded defined benchmarks, and whether the MHS had created a culture of safety with effective processes for ensuring safe and reliable care of beneficiaries.

“The review found pockets of excellence, significant excellence which we’re very proud of,” Hagel said, “and extraordinary doctors, nurses and staff who are deeply dedicated to the patients they serve.”

Hagel said he’s directing the department to take steps to ensure that the entire military health care system is not just an average system but a leading one.

+ Military Health System Action Plan for Access, Quality of Care, and Patient Safety
See: Final Report to the Secretary of Defense: Military Health System Review

Final Report to the Secretary of Defense: Military Health System Review

October 3, 2014 Comments off

Final Report to the Secretary of Defense: Military Health System Review – Final Report (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of Defense

On May 28, 2014, the Secretary of Defense ordered a comprehensive review of the Military Health System (MHS). The review was directed to assess whether: 1) access to medical care in the MHS meets defined access standards; 2) the quality of health care in the MHS meets or exceeds defined benchmarks; and 3) the MHS has created a culture of safety with effective processes for ensuring safe and reliable care of beneficiaries. This is the first time the MHS has taken an enterprise view of such scope in these areas.

Based on information analyzed during the review, the MHS provides good quality care that is safe and timely, and is comparable to that found in the civilian sector. However, the MHS demonstrates wide performance variability with some areas better than civilian counterparts and other areas below national benchmarks.

See also: Report appendices (PDF)

DOD OIG — Evaluation of Military Criminal Investigative Organizations’ Child Sexual Assault Investigations

October 2, 2014 Comments off

Evaluation of Military Criminal Investigative Organizations’ Child Sexual Assault Investigations
Source: U.S. Department of Defense, Office of Inspector General

Objective

We evaluated 163 Military Criminal Investigative Organization (MCIO) investigations of sexual assaults of children closed in 2012 to determine whether the MCIOs completed investigations as required by DoD, Military Service, and MCIO guidance. Our evaluation focused on:

  • whether the MCIOs investigated child sexual assaults as required by guiding policies and procedures.

Findings

  • A total of 153 of 163 MCIO investigations (94 percent) met investigative standards.
  • A total of 10 of 163 MCIO investigations (6 percent) had significant deficiencies. We returned those 10 cases to the MCIOs for follow-up corrective action.
  • A total of 57 of the 163 cases had no investigative deficiencies.
  • The remaining 96 cases had minor deficiencies that had no impact on the outcome or resolution of the investigation.
  • All three MCIOs had instances in which:

    - they either did not issue or did not properly document the issuance of the DD Form 2701, “Initial Information for Victims and Witnesses of Crime,” to victims or – – the appropriate guardian or family member;
    – subject, victim, and witness interviews were not thorough;
    – logical investigative leads, such as interviews of witnesses, or leads gleaned during interviews were not addressed or conducted; and
    – physical or digital evidence was not collected.

Recommendations

  • The Director and Commanders of the MCIOs:

- continue to emphasize thorough completion of all child sexual assault investigations,
– implement measures to improve the issuing and/or recording the DD Form 2701, and
– consider enhancement of existing policy guidance regarding the collection of clothing and digital evidence

  • The Director, Naval Criminal Investigative Service improve guidance and enhance supervision regarding responses to crime scenes.

Management Comments and Our Response

Management comments were generally responsive; however, the Commander, U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command (CID) expressed concern regarding our review processes. The project’s evaluation and reporting processes were independently evaluated and were found to comply with the Council of Inspectors General for Integrity and Efficiency (CIGIE) standards. We considered management comments on a draft of this report when preparing the final report and made changes as appropriate.

Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Needs to Provide Better Accountability and Transparency Over Direct Contributions

October 1, 2014 Comments off

Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Needs to Provide Better Accountability and Transparency Over Direct Contributions
Source: U.S. Department of Defense, Office of Inspector General

Objective

Our objective was to determine whether the Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan’s (GIRoA) Ministries of Defense (MoD) and Interior (MoI) have controls in place to ensure a transparent and accountable fiscal process for the direct funding provided for the sustainment of the Afghan National Security Force (ANSF).

Findings

GIRoA lacked the basic controls to provide reasonable assurance that it appropriately spent $3.3 billion of ASFF direct contributions. These controls are key aspects of a transparent and accountable fiscal process. Specifically,

  • Ministry of Finance (MoF) could not provide a current cash balance for direct contributions or account for currency gains of at least $110.4 million made on Afghanistan Security Forces Fund (ASFF) direct contributions.
  • MoF could not provide support for $17.4 million and MoI could not support $9.9 million withheld from ANSF salaries.
  • MoD and MoI controls over the payroll process were not adequate.
  • MoI processed $40 million in payroll payments that appeared improper.
  • MoD and MoI incorrectly charged $82.7 million of ASFF direct contribution funds.
  • This occurred because GIRoA did not develop the ministerial capability and capacity tomanage and oversee ASFF direct contributions and Combined Security Transition Command–Afghanistan (CSTC-A) had not held GIRoA accountable for not implementing controls and improper handling of ASFF direct contribution funds.

As a result, CSTC-A could not verify that GIRoA used ASFF direct contributions properly or for their intended purposes. In addition, the $13 billion in additional direct contributions DoD plans to provide to the ANSF between FY 2015 and FY 2019 may be subject to wasteful spending and abuse.

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