Getting Value From FullTextReports?

October 20, 2014 Comments off

Then please consider making a contribution. Frankly, I’d like to get rid of the ads, but they do provide a small income stream that helps support FullTextReports.

Particularly if you are profit-making entity using this blog…say, via your intranet for current awareness, consider making an occasional donation.

As of right now, FullTextReports will continue to be a free service.

PayPal Donate Button

About these ads
Categories: admin - FTR

Note to FullTextReports followers…

September 11, 2013 Comments off

Some of the papers and reports posted on FullTextReports.com are freely available online for just a limited time before they disappear behind a paywall (or go away entirely). If you see something you suspect might be useful to you (or a colleague) in the future, download it the day you see it because it may not be accessible later without a subscription (or it may have been moved or taken offline). FullTextReports.com provides links only and does not archive papers and reports.

Also note: FullTextReports.com includes documents from a wide range of organizations, many of which exist to promote a specific agenda. The serious researcher may want to do a little checking around before relying on information in reports issued by entities whose mission is…unfamiliar.

Disclaimer: WordPress has begun placing advertising on this blog. Any ads you see do NOT constitute an endorsement by FullTextReports.com. If you see anything offensive, please notify FullTextReports@gmail.com.

Categories: admin - FTR

Women in National Parliaments (Situation as of 1st October 2014)

October 24, 2014 Comments off

Women in National Parliaments
Source: Inter-Parliamentary Union

The data in the table below has been compiled by the Inter-Parliamentary Union on the basis of information provided by National Parliaments by 1st October 2014. 189 countries are classified by descending order of the percentage of women in the lower or single House. Comparative data on the world and regional averages as well as data concerning the two regional parliamentary assemblies elected by direct suffrage can be found on separate pages. You can use the PARLINE database to view detailed results of parliamentary elections by country.

Hat tip: IWS Documented News Service

New From the GAO

October 24, 2014 Comments off

New GAO Report
Source: Government Accountability Office

Managing for Results: Selected Agencies Need To Take Additional Efforts to Improve Customer Service. GAO-15-84, October 24.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-15-84
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/666651.pdf
Podcast – http://www.gao.gov/multimedia/podcasts/666613

Wastebook 2014: What Washington doesn’t want you to read.

October 24, 2014 Comments off

Wastebook 2014: What Washington doesn’t want you to read.
Source: U.S. Senator Tom Coburn (R-OK)

Gambling monkeys, dancing zombies and mountain lions on treadmills are just a few projects exposed in Wastebook 2014 – highlighting $25 billion in Washington’s worst spending of the year.

Wastebook 2014 — the report Washington doesn’t want you to read —reveals the 100 most outlandish government expenditures this year, costing taxpayers billions of dollars.

Examples of wasteful spending highlighted in “Wastebook 2014” include:

  • Coast guard party patrols – $100,000
  • Watching grass grow – $10,000
  • State department tweets @ terrorists – $3 million
  • Swedish massages for rabbits – $387,000
  • Paid vacations for bureaucrats gone wild – $20 million
  • Mountain lions on a treadmill – $856,000
  • Synchronized swimming for sea monkeys – $50,000
  • Pentagon to destroy $16 billion in unused ammunition — $1 billion
  • Scientists hope monkey gambling unlocks secrets of free will –$171,000
  • Rich and famous rent out their luxury pads tax free – $10 million
  • Studying “hangry” spouses stabbing voodoo dolls – $331,000
  • Promoting U.S. culture around the globe with nose flutists – $90 million

Federal School Finance Reform: Moving Toward Title I Funding Following the Child

October 24, 2014 Comments off

Federal School Finance Reform: Moving Toward Title I Funding Following the Child
Source: Reason Foundation

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) was signed into law in 1965 as part of President Lyndon Johnson’s “war on poverty.” The Act was designed to help disadvantaged students meet challenging state academic standards. Originally authorized in 1970, the ESEA has been reauthorized routinely through the early 2000s. The last authorization of ESEA came in the form of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB), which expired in 2007.

While Congress has not reauthorized the ESEA since the expiration of NCLB, most ESEA programs still receive appropriations. As it is currently written in federal statutes, the ESEA contains eight titles each directing federal funding toward different initiatives, all of which aim to improve education for disadvantaged students. At the crux of the ESEA is the Title I program, as it is the most far-reaching and heavily funded. Where other titles under the ESEA outline grants to states for specific initiatives—like teacher training, school choice, English language instruction or state assessments—Title I grants go toward any and all students who qualify as low-income.

The Title I program has fallen under scrutiny in the last decade. A common complaint is that stipulations in the legislation do not address funding inequities between Title I and non-Title I schools.

The Impact of Piketty’s Wealth Tax on the Poor, the Rich, and the Middle Class

October 24, 2014 Comments off

The Impact of Piketty’s Wealth Tax on the Poor, the Rich, and the Middle Class
Source: Tax Foundation

In his bestseller Capital in the Twenty-First Century, Thomas Piketty recommends a wealth tax as a remedy to inequality. The basic version of Piketty’s wealth tax would impose a tax rate of 1 percent on net worth of $1.3 million and $6.5 million and 2 percent on net worth above $6.5 million. Piketty contemplates additional tax brackets, including a bracket of 0.5 percent starting at about $260,000.

We used the Tax Foundation’s Taxes and Growth (TAG) model, augmented with wealth data from the University of Michigan’s Panel Study of Income Dynamics, to estimate how the U.S. economy would respond to Piketty’s wealth taxes.

The Chapman Survey on American Fears

October 24, 2014 Comments off

The Chapman Survey on American Fears
Source: Chapman University

Chapman University has initiated a nationwide poll on what strikes fear in Americans. The Chapman Survey on American Fears included 1,500 participants from across the nation and all walks of life. The research team leading this effort pared the information down into four basic categories: personal fears, crime, natural disasters and fear factors. According to the Chapman poll, the number one fear in America today is walking alone at night.

A multi-disciplinary team of Chapman faculty and students wanted to capture this information on a year-over-year basis to draw comparisons regarding what items are increasing in fear as well as decreasing. The fears are presented according to fears vs. concerns because that was the necessary phrasing to capture the information correctly.

Do (Even) Depressed Individuals Believe That Life Gets Better and Better? The Link Between Depression and Subjective Trajectories for Life Satisfaction

October 24, 2014 Comments off

Do (Even) Depressed Individuals Believe That Life Gets Better and Better? The Link Between Depression and Subjective Trajectories for Life Satisfaction
Source: Clinical Psychological Science

We investigated the widespread belief that life gets better and better over time—as revealed in individuals’ “subjective trajectories” for life satisfaction (LS) derived from their ratings of recollected past, current, and anticipated future LS—among depressed (i.e., current major depressive disorder, fully remitted, partially remitted) and nondepressed groups using a two-wave longitudinal sample of American adults. Linear and inclining subjective trajectories (past LS < current LS < future LS) were normative among nondepressed individuals, as were nonlinear but inclining subjective trajectories (past LS ~ current LS < future LS) among depressed individuals. Furthermore, Wave 1 temporal-perspective LS ratings uniquely predicted risk of depression 10 years later (Wave 2), even after we controlled for baseline depression status. Thus, the use of a novel temporally expanded perspective revealed that even depressed individuals view their lives as improving over time and that such beliefs predict heightened (rather than less) risk of future depression.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 938 other followers