Archive

Archive for the ‘Ohio State University’ Category

American Families Taking ‘Divergent Paths,’ Study Finds

September 11, 2013 Comments off

American Families Taking ‘Divergent Paths,’ Study Finds
Source: Ohio State University

After a period of relative calm during the 1990s, rapid changes in American families began anew during the 2000s, a new analysis suggests.

Young people delayed marriage longer than ever before, permanent singlehood increased, and divorce and remarriage continued to rise during the first decade of the century.

But the most troubling finding, researchers say, may be how American families have taken divergent paths: White people, the educated and the economically secure have much more stable family situations than minorities, the uneducated and the poor.

“The state of American families has become increasingly polarized,” said Zhenchao Qian, author of the new study and professor of sociology at The Ohio State University.

“Race and ethnicity, education, economics and immigration status are increasingly linked to how well families fare.”

About these ads

Terror, Security, and Money: Balancing the Risks, Benefits, and Costs of Homeland Security

May 6, 2011 Comments off

Terror, Security, and Money: Balancing the Risks, Benefits, and Costs of Homeland Security (PDF)
Source: Mershon Center for International Security Studies, Ohio State University

The cumulative increase in expenditures on US domestic homeland security over the decade since 9/11 exceeds one trillion dollars. It is clearly time to examine these massive expenditures applying risk assessment and cost-benefit approaches that have been standard for decades. Thus far, officials do not seem to have done so and have engaged in various forms of probability neglect by focusing on worst case scenarios; adding, rather than multiplying, the probabilities; assessing relative, rather than absolute, risk; and inflating terrorist capacities and the importance of potential terrorist targets. We find that enhanced expenditures have been excessive: to be deemed cost-effective in analyses that substantially bias the consideration toward the opposite conclusion, they would have to deter, prevent, foil, or protect against 1,667 otherwise successful Times-Square type attacks per year, or more than four per day. Although there are emotional and political pressures on the terrorism issue, this does not relieve politicians and bureaucrats of the fundamental responsibility of informing the public of the limited risk that terrorism presents and of seeking to expend funds wisely. Moreover, political concerns may be over-wrought: restrained reaction has often proved to be entirely acceptable politically.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 784 other followers