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Archive for the ‘technology and internet’ Category

The Application of Platforms to Prevent Child Pornography

July 21, 2014 Comments off

The Application of Platforms to Prevent Child Pornography (PDF)
Source: International Journal of Scientific & Engineering Research

The advancement of information and communication technology specifically the Internet has used by many people especially young people to facilitate their daily life activities, for instance, e-learning. Through e-learning facility, some abuse it by involving into the business of pornography. This paper tries to explore the application of platforms, whether can prevent child pornography over the capturing end user technique, dilemma international child pornography law, imposing severe punishment, education and public awareness raising with respect to the Theory of Planned Behavioral (TPB). The survey shows that in the behavioral belief’s factor scored low correlations. However, the education and public awareness raising, blocking and filtering platforms and harmonization of the dilemma international child pornography law showed a slight high scored value. This indicates that, not only blocking, filtering platforms, education, public awareness raising, and harmonization of the dilemma international child pornography law can prevent child pornography but also imposing severe punishment and capturing end user technique can prevent child pornography with the make use of Theory of Planned Behavioral (TPB).

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Information Exposed: Historical Examination of Data Breaches in New York State

July 21, 2014 Comments off

Information Exposed: Historical Examination of Data Breaches in New York State (PDF)
Source: New York State Attorney General
From press release:

Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman today issued a new report examining the growing number, complexity, and costs of data breaches in the New York State. Using information provided to the Attorney General’s Office pursuant to the New York State Information Security Breach & Notification Act, the report, titled “Information Exposed: Historical Examination of Data Security in New York State, analyzes eight years of security breach data and how it has impacted New Yorkers.

The report reveals that the number of reported data security breaches in New York more than tripled between 2006 and 2013. In that same period, 22.8 million personal records of New Yorkers have been exposed in nearly 5,000 data breaches, which have cost the public and private sectors in New York upward of $1.37 billion in 2013. In addition, the report also found that hacking intrusions – in which third parties gain unauthorized access to data stored on a computer system – were the leading cause of data security breaches, accounting for roughly 40 percent of all breaches. Attorney General Schneiderman’s report also presents new recommendations on steps that both organizations and consumers can take to protect themselves from data loss.

Understanding the Value of Social Media at Airports for Customer Engagement

July 18, 2014 Comments off

Understanding the Value of Social Media at Airports for Customer Engagement
Source: Transportation Research Board

TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Synthesis 56: Understanding the Value of Social Media at Airports for Customer Engagement compiles current literature and practice on how airport operators utilize social media to enhance customer engagement.

Oversight Issues in Mobile Payments

July 17, 2014 Comments off

Oversight Issues in Mobile Payments
Source: International Monetary Fund

This paper examines oversight issues that underlie the potential growth and risks in mobile payments. International experience suggests that financial authorities can develop effective oversight frameworks for new payment methods to safeguard public confidence and financial stability by establishing: (i) a clear legal regime; (ii) proportionate AML/CFT measures to prevent financial integrity risks; (iii) fund safeguarding measures such as insurance, similar guarantee schemes, or “pass through” deposit insurance; (iv) contingency plans for operational disruptions; and (v) risk controls and access criteria in payment systems. Such measures are particularly important for low-income countries where diffusion is becoming more widespread.

New From the GAO

July 17, 2014 Comments off

New GAO Reports
Source: Government Accountability Office

1. National Nuclear Security Administration: Agency Expanded Use of Some Federal Oversight Reforms, but Is Still Determining Future Plans. GAO-14-588, July 17.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-588
Highlights - http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/664836.pdf

2. Missile Defense: DOD’s Report Provides Limited Insight on Improvements to Homeland Missile Defense and Acquisition Plans. GAO-14-626R, July 17.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-626R

3. Information Security: FDIC Made Progress in Securing Key Financial Systems, but Weaknesses Remain. GAO-14-674, July 17.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-674
Highlights - http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/664841.pdf

Congress Should End – Not Extend – the Ban on State and Local Taxation of Internet Access Subscriptions

July 16, 2014 Comments off

Congress Should End – Not Extend – the Ban on State and Local Taxation of Internet Access Subscriptions
Source: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

The Internet Tax Freedom Act (ITFA), enacted in 1998 and temporarily renewed in 2001, 2004, and 2007, imposed a moratorium on new state and local taxes on monthly Internet access fees while preserving (“grandfathering”) existing Internet access taxes. The House Judiciary Committee recently approved a bill to eliminate the grandfather provision and permanently ban all state and local taxation of Internet access subscriptions. This represents the first time that Congress has seriously considered a permanent ban on taxing Internet service for all states, including those now using these taxes to help support public services. Rather than extend ITFA indefinitely, Congress should lift the ban and let states decide whether they and their local governments will impose their sales and telecommunications taxes on Internet access charges.

Global Opposition to U.S. Surveillance and Drones, but Limited Harm to America’s Image

July 16, 2014 Comments off

Global Opposition to U.S. Surveillance and Drones, but Limited Harm to America’s Image
Source: Pew Research Global Attitudes Project

Revelations about the scope of American electronic surveillance efforts have generated headlines around the world over the past year. And a new Pew Research Center survey finds widespread global opposition to U.S. eavesdropping and a decline in the view that the U.S. respects the personal freedoms of its people. But in most countries there is little evidence this opposition has severely harmed America’s overall image.

UK Consumers Open to Pure Digital Banks, According to Accenture Survey

July 16, 2014 Comments off

UK Consumers Open to Pure Digital Banks, According to Accenture Survey (PDF)
Source: Accenture

One-quarter (25 percent) of UK consumers would consider using a pure digital bank – a bank with no branches or call centres that is only accessible via laptops and mobile devices, according to the latest survey of UK current account customers conducted by Accenture (NYSE: ACN).

Customers aged 25 to 34 are most keen on the idea of a pure digital, branchless bank; 33 percent would consider using one, while the youngest group of bank customers – those aged 18 to 24 – are the least receptive, with only 22 percent saying they would consider it.

Based on interviews with more than 3,600 UK current account holders, the survey points to continuing growth in the use of digital banking channels. It shows that 80 percent of customers went online at least once a month to interact with their banks, while monthly mobile banking usage has risen to 27 percent of customers compared with 21 percent in 2012 and 10 percent in 2011.

However, the survey also points to a rise in customers using branches. According to the survey, the number of customers going into a branch at least once a month has risen from 45 percent in 2012 to 52 percent this year, with the most pronounced increase among customers aged 18 to 24. Fifty-four percent of the youngest group, say they visit their bank branch each month compared to 39 percent of the same group in 2012.

Research and Experimental Development, Government and Private Non-Profit Organisations, Australia, 2012-13

July 15, 2014 Comments off

Research and Experimental Development, Government and Private Non-Profit Organisations, Australia, 2012-13
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Expenditure and human resources devoted to research and experimental development (R&D) carried out by government and private non-profit organisations in Australia, classified by socioeconomic objective, field of research, type of expenditure, type of activity, source of funds, type of employee and location of expenditure. Most data are expressed in current prices but key aggregates are also expressed in volume terms.

Using Ethical-Response Surveys to Identify Sources of Disapproval and Concern with Facebook’s Emotional Contagion Experiment and Other Controversial Studies

July 15, 2014 Comments off

Using Ethical-Response Surveys to Identify Sources of Disapproval and Concern with Facebook’s Emotional Contagion Experiment and Other Controversial Studies
Source: Microsoft Research

We surveyed 3570 workers on Amazon’s Mechanical Turk to gauge their ethical response to five scenarios describing scientific experiments—including one scenario describing Facebook’s emotional contagion experiment. We will post an update of this paper containing the results and analysis on or after 12:01AM Pacific on Monday July 14.

TV Watching and Computer Use in U.S. Youth Aged 12–15, 2012

July 15, 2014 Comments off

TV Watching and Computer Use in U.S. Youth Aged 12–15, 2012
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings

Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and the NHANES National Youth Fitness Survey, 2012

  • Nearly all (98.5%) youth aged 12–15 reported watching TV daily.
  • More than 9 in 10 (91.1%) youth aged 12–15 reported using the computer daily outside of school.
  • In 2012, 27.0% of youth aged 12–15 had 2 hours or less of TV plus computer use daily.
  • Among youth aged 12–15, girls (80.4%) were more likely to use the computer 2 hours or less daily when compared with boys (69.4%).
  • Fewer non-Hispanic black youth aged 12–15 (53.4%) reported watching 2 hours or less of TV daily than non-Hispanic white (65.8%) and Hispanic (68.7%) youth.

Excessive screen-time behaviors, such as using a computer and watching TV, for more than 2 hours daily have been linked with elevated blood pressure, elevated serum cholesterol, and being overweight or obese among youth (1–3). Additionally, screen-time behavior established in adolescence has been shown to track into adulthood (4). The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-supported Expert Panel and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommend that children limit leisure screen time to 2 hours or less daily (5,6). This report presents national estimates of TV watching and computer use outside of the school day.

Global Internet Privacy Study Reveals Consumers’ Conflicting Views

July 14, 2014 Comments off

Global Internet Privacy Study Reveals Consumers’ Conflicting Views
Source: EMC Corporation

Highlights

  • Taps into privacy attitudes of 15,000 consumers from 15 countries
  • 91% of respondents value the benefit of “easier access to information and knowledge” that digital technology affords
  • Only 27% say they are willing to trade some privacy for greater convenience and ease online
  • Only 41% believe government is committed to protecting their privacy
  • 81% expect privacy to erode over the next five years; 59% say they have less privacy than a year ago

2013-2014 COSLA Survey: Overview Results from the American Library Association’s survey of Chief Officers of State Library Agencies

July 14, 2014 Comments off

2013-2014 COSLA Survey: Overview Results from the American Library Association’s survey of Chief Officers of State Library Agencies (PDF)
Source: American Library Association

Libraries continue to provide their vital community service despite the cuts of the past five years. There continue to be reductions in hours and flat budgets – but perhaps the constant budget cuts are leveling off for public libraries. That flattening (and some increases) may not recover losses from years of state belt-tightening, highlighted in our trend graph.

Public libraries continue to look for ways to keep pace with broadband needs –few respondents feel that their libraries are prepared to handle the bandwidth loads in the coming years.

The association between internet addiction and psychiatric co-morbidity: a meta-analysis

July 14, 2014 Comments off

The association between internet addiction and psychiatric co-morbidity: a meta-analysis
Source: BMC Psychiatry

Background
This study evaluates the association between Internal Addiction (IA) and psychiatric co-morbidity in the literature.

Methods
Meta-analyses were conducted on cross-sectional, case-control and cohort studies which examined the relationship between IA and psychiatric co-morbidity. Selected studies were extracted from major online databases. The inclusion criteria are as follows: 1) studies conducted on human subjects; 2) IA and psychiatric co-morbidity were assessed by standardised questionnaires; and 3) availability of adequate information to calculate the effect size. Random-effects models were used to calculate the aggregate prevalence and the pooled odds ratios (OR).

Results
Eight studies comprising 1641 patients suffering from IA and 11210 controls were included. Our analyses demonstrated a significant and positive association between IA and alcohol abuse (OR = 3.05, 95% CI = 2.14-4.37, z = 6.12, P < 0.001), attention deficit and hyperactivity (OR = 2.85, 95% CI = 2.15-3.77, z = 7.27, P < 0.001), depression (OR = 2.77, 95% CI = 2.04-3.75, z = 6.55, P < 0.001) and anxiety (OR = 2.70, 95% CI = 1.46-4.97, z = 3.18, P = 0.001).

Conclusions
IA is significantly associated with alcohol abuse, attention deficit and hyperactivity, depression and anxiety.

The Shortest Path to Happiness: Recommending Beautiful, Quiet, and Happy Routes in the City

July 14, 2014 Comments off

The Shortest Path to Happiness: Recommending Beautiful, Quiet, and Happy Routes in the City
Source: arXiv.org

When providing directions to a place, web and mobile mapping services are all able to suggest the shortest route. The goal of this work is to automatically suggest routes that are not only short but also emotionally pleasant. To quantify the extent to which urban locations are pleasant, we use data from a crowd-sourcing platform that shows two street scenes in London (out of hundreds), and a user votes on which one looks more beautiful, quiet, and happy. We consider votes from more than 3.3K individuals and translate them into quantitative measures of location perceptions. We arrange those locations into a graph upon which we learn pleasant routes. Based on a quantitative validation, we find that, compared to the shortest routes, the recommended ones add just a few extra walking minutes and are indeed perceived to be more beautiful, quiet, and happy. To test the generality of our approach, we consider Flickr metadata of more than 3.7M pictures in London and 1.3M in Boston, compute proxies for the crowdsourced beauty dimension (the one for which we have collected the most votes), and evaluate those proxies with 30 participants in London and 54 in Boston. These participants have not only rated our recommendations but have also carefully motivated their choices, providing insights for future work.

Hat tip: ResearchBuzz

Measuring Post Traumatic Stress Disorder in Twitter

July 11, 2014 Comments off

Measuring Post Traumatic Stress Disorder in Twitter
Source: AAAI Publications, Eighth International AAAI Conference on Weblogs and Social Media

Traditional mental health studies rely on information primarily collected through personal contact with a health care professional. Recent work has shown the utility of social media data for studying depression, but there have been limited evaluations of other mental health conditions. We consider post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a serious condition that affects millions worldwide, with especially high rates in military veterans. We also present a novel method to obtain a PTSD classifier for social media using simple searches of available Twitter data, a significant reduction in training data cost compared to previous work. We demonstrate its utility by examining differences in language use between PTSD and random individuals, building classifiers to separate these two groups and by detecting elevated rates of PTSD at and around U.S. military bases using our classifiers.

Twitter as Social Sensor: Dynamics and Structure in Major Sporting Events

July 11, 2014 Comments off

Twitter as Social Sensor: Dynamics and Structure in Major Sporting Events
Source: MIT

Twitter often behaves like a “social sensor” in which users actively sense real-world events and spontaneously mention these events in cyberspace. Here, we study the temporal dynamics and structural properties of Twitter as a social sensor in major sporting events. By examining Japanese professional baseball games, we found that Twitter as a social sensor can immediately show reactions to positive and negative events by a burst of tweets, but only positive events induce a burst of retweets to follow. In addition, retweet networks during the baseball games exhibit clear polarization in user clusters depending on baseball teams, as well as a scale-free in-degree distribution. These empirical findings provide mechanistic insights into the emergence and evolution of social sensors.

Hat tip: Research Buzz

Overcoming Speed Bumps on the Road to Telematics: Challenges and opportunities facing auto insurers

July 11, 2014 Comments off

Overcoming Speed Bumps on the Road to Telematics: Challenges and opportunities facing auto insurers
Source: Deloitte

Early adopters of telematics are collecting data that can reveal a driver’s behavior, which in turn can provide a basis for greater precision in insurance underwriting, pricing and claims. Having such first-hand driving data at their disposal could give existing usage-based insurance (UBI) carriers a considerable leg up over those not using telematics. Of course, early adopters still face many challenges in executing a viable telematics program.

In order to get a better idea of consumers’ reactions to UBI, Deloitte surveyed more than 2,000 respondents about their experiences with consumer mobile technology. We have placed the respondents in three categories — Eager Beavers, Fence Sitters and Naysayers — based on their willingness to have their driving monitored by insurers.

This report provides data and analysis that may help guide carriers that have already started on the road to telematics, along with those poised to join in, as well as others that will have to compete with telematics-driven players.

See also: Telematics: How Big Data Is Transforming the Auto Insurance Industry (SAS; PDF)

60 Government Sites in 60 Minutes

July 10, 2014 Comments off

60 Government Sites in 60 Minutes (PDF)
Source: LexisNexis (SLA)
Annotated list of helpful government-related websites. From SLA 2014 Annual Conference presentation by Marie Kaddell, Sr. Information Professional Consultant and Chris Vestal, Government Consultant

Higher Education, Library Principles to Preserve Network Neutrality

July 10, 2014 Comments off

Higher Education, Library Principles to Preserve Network Neutrality
Source: EDUCAUSE

On July 10, 2014, EDUCAUSE joined other leading higher education and library associations (listed below) in proposing a set of network neutrality principles for the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to use in developing new regulations to preserve the “open Internet.” These groups urged the FCC to adopt these principles in light of a recent court decision vacating two of the key network neutrality rules previously in place, which they believe creates an opportunity for Internet providers to block or degrade (e.g., arbitrarily slow) certain Internet traffic, or prioritize certain services, while relegating the online content and services of colleges, universities, and libraries to the “slow lane.” The groups argue that new network neutrality rules based on these principles will ensure that the Internet remains a vital, vibrant platform for teaching, learning, research, and community support and engagement.

The organizations endorsing the principles are:

American Association of Community Colleges (AACC)
American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU)
American Council on Education (ACE)
American Library Association (ALA)
Association of American Universities (AAU)
Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU)
Association of Research Libraries (ARL)
Chief Officers of State Library Agencies (COSLA)
EDUCAUSE
Modern Language Association (MLA)
National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU)

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