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Current Contraceptive Status Among Women Aged 15–44: United States, 2011–2013

December 16, 2014 Comments off

Current Contraceptive Status Among Women Aged 15–44: United States, 2011–2013 (PDF)
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings
Data from the 2011–2013 National Survey of Family Growth

  • In 2011–2013, 61.7% of the 60.9 million women aged 15–44 in the United States were currently using contraception. The most common contraceptive methods currently being used were the pill (16.0%), female sterilization (15.5%), male condoms (9.4%), and long-acting reversible contraceptives (7.2%).
  • Use of long-acting reversible contraceptives was higher among women aged 25–34 (11.1%) compared with women aged 15–24 (5.0%) and aged 35–44 (5.3%).
  • Current condom use was similar across the three Hispanic origin and race groups shown in this report (about 9%).
  • Current use of female sterilization declined, and use of the pill increased with greater educational attainment. Use of long-acting reversible contraceptives was similar across education, about 8%–10%.

Births in the United States, 2013

December 15, 2014 Comments off

Births in the United States, 2013
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings
Data from the National Vital Statistics System

  • There were 3.93 million births in the United States in 2013, down less than 1% from 2012 and 9% from the 2007 high. The U.S. general fertility rate was at an all-time low in 2013.
  • Birth rates dropped to record lows in 2013 among women under age 30 and rose for most age groups 30 and over.
  • The cesarean delivery rate declined less than 1% from 2012 to 2013, to 32.7% of births. This rate rose nearly 60% from 1996 to 2009, but was down slightly from the 2009 high.
  • The 2013 preterm birth rate was 11.39%, down 1% from 2012 and 11% from the 2006 peak. Declines in preterm rates since 2006 were reported across the United States.
  • The twin birth rate, which had been mostly stable for 2009–2012, rose 2% in 2013 to 33.7 per 1,000 births.

FDA approves Gardasil 9 for prevention of certain cancers caused by five additional types of HPV

December 15, 2014 Comments off

FDA approves Gardasil 9 for prevention of certain cancers caused by five additional types of HPV
Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Gardasil 9 (Human Papillomavirus 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant) for the prevention of certain diseases caused by nine types of Human Papillomavirus (HPV). Covering nine HPV types, five more HPV types than Gardasil (previously approved by the FDA), Gardasil 9 has the potential to prevent approximately 90 percent of cervical, vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers.

Gardasil 9 is a vaccine approved for use in females ages 9 through 26 and males ages 9 through 15. It is approved for the prevention of cervical, vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers caused by HPV types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58, and for the prevention of genital warts caused by HPV types 6 or 11. Gardasil 9 adds protection against five additional HPV types—31, 33, 45, 52 and 58— which cause approximately 20 percent of cervical cancers and are not covered by previously FDA-approved HPV vaccines.

FDA issues final rule on changes to pregnancy and lactation labeling information for prescription drug and biological products

December 4, 2014 Comments off

FDA issues final rule on changes to pregnancy and lactation labeling information for prescription drug and biological products
Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration published a final rule today that sets standards for how information about using medicines during pregnancy and breastfeeding is presented in the labeling of prescription drugs and biological products. The new content and formatting requirements will provide a more consistent way to include relevant information about the risks and benefits of prescription drugs and biological products used during pregnancy and breastfeeding.

The final rule replaces the current product letter categories – A, B, C, D and X – used to classify the risks of using prescription drugs during pregnancy with three detailed subsections that describe risks within the real-world context of caring for pregnant women who may need medication.

U.S. Preterm Birth Rate Hits Healthy People 2020 Goal Seven Years Early

November 14, 2014 Comments off

U.S. Preterm Birth Rate Hits Healthy People 2020 Goal Seven Years Early
Source: March of Dimes

The national preterm birth rate fell to 11.4 percent in 2013 – the lowest in 17 years — meeting the federal Healthy People 2020 goal seven years early. Despite this progress, the U.S. still received a “C” on the 7th annual March of Dimes Premature Birth Report Card because it fell short of the more-challenging 9.6 percent target set by the March of Dimes, the group said today.

Millions of US women are not getting screened for cervical cancer

November 7, 2014 Comments off

Millions of US women are not getting screened for cervical cancer
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Key findings:

  • In 2012, 11.4 percent of women reported they had not been screened for cervical cancer in the past five years; the percentage was larger for women without health insurance (23.1 percent) and for those without a regular health care provider (25.5 percent).
  • The percentage of women not screened as recommended (www.cdc.gov/cancer/cervical/basic_info/screening.htm) was higher among older women (12.6 percent), Asians/Pacific Islanders (19.7 percent), and American Indians/Alaska Natives (16.5 percent).
  • From 2007 to 2011, the cervical cancer incidence rate decreased by 1.9 percent per year while the death rate remained stable.
  • The Southern region had the highest rate of cervical cancer (8.5 per 100,000), the highest death rate (2.7 per 100,000), and the largest percentage of women who had not been screened in the past five years (12.3 percent).

International Comparisons of Infant Mortality and Related Factors: United States and Europe, 2010

November 7, 2014 Comments off

International Comparisons of Infant Mortality and Related Factors: United States and Europe, 2010 (PDF)
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Infant mortality is an important indicator of the health of a nation because it is associated with a variety of factors such as maternal health, quality and access to medical care, socioeconomic conditions, and public health practices (1–3). After a plateau from 2000 to 2005 (4), the U.S. infant mortality rate declined from 6.87 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in 2005 to 6.07 in 2011 (5,6). Yet, the United States’ infant mortality rate remains higher than for most other developed countries (7). This report compares infant mortality rates between the United States and selected European countries and assesses the impact on infant mortality differences of the percentage of preterm births and gestational age-specific infant mortality rates.

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