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HR Policy Association Weighs in With Congress for Increased Access for Exceptionally Skilled Foreign Students

August 4, 2011 Comments off

HR Policy Association Weighs in With Congress for Increased Access for Exceptionally Skilled Foreign Students (PDF)
Source: Association of Chief Human Resource Officers

This week, HR Policy Association, representing the most senior human resource executives in more than 325 of the largest companies in the United States, submitted testimony for a hearing by the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration, Refugees and Border Security on the need for increased access to green cards for foreign students with science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) skills who study at U.S. universities, and other highly skilled immigrants.

HR Policy Association believes that the United States remains a magnet for many talented individuals from overseas and that when the U.S. turns away foreign professionals, or sends promising graduates home, it does itself a grievous disservice. Global companies will pursue talent regardless of where it is physically located. The key question for the United States is whether it wants that talent employed here or in the nation of one of its global competitors.

The Association is also concerned that the U.S. debate over immigration reform often fails to place immigration policy in the broader context of education and competitiveness policy, particularly when it comes to meeting America’s needs for greater STEM skill talent. Unfortunately, in recent decades, policymakers have proved largely unable to adjust immigration rules to admit the manpower that U.S. companies require to grow.

Recently, the Association released Blueprint for Jobs in the 21st Century: A Vision for a Competitive Human Resource Policy for the American Workforce, which represents nearly 18 months of work among the Association’s members. The 125 page report paints a detailed picture of the new global economic, social, legal, and demographic forces influencing job growth in the United States, and then offers 20 specific recommendations in the fields of education, workforce development, immigration, regulatory reform, and health care to encourage job growth and employee retention in the United States.

+ Statement Submitted for the Record Before the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration, Refugees and Border Security (PDF)

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