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U.S. Department of Education Announces Final Rule to Help Colleges Keep Campuses Safe

October 17, 2014 Comments off

U.S. Department of Education Announces Final Rule to Help Colleges Keep Campuses Safe
Source: U.S. Department of Education

The Obama Administration today announced publication of the final rule implementing changes made to the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act) by the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (VAWA). That law and the new rule strengthen the Clery Act to more effectively address, and ultimately reduce, sexual violence on college campuses, including, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking.

The Clery Act requires institutions of higher education to comply with certain campus safety- and security-related requirements as a condition of participating in the Federal student financial aid programs authorized by Title IV of the Higher Education Act.

Earlier this year, the Department announced that a negotiating rulemaking committee, representing a broad range of experience, interests, and perspectives including campus law enforcement and security professionals, victim advocates, school attorneys, student affairs professionals, and most importantly, students, reached consensus on the draft of the new campus safety provisions. Those draft provisions were published in the Federal Register on June 20 as a proposed rule (NPRM) and included a 30-day public comment period.

Based on comments received from a variety of individuals and groups after publication of the proposed rule, the final rule includes additional requirements to ensure that institutions provide the most complete information possible to their students, better inform and protect victims, and clarify the process for collecting crime statistics and for disclosing in their annual security report the number of crime incidents that were fully investigated and determined to be unfounded, and thus, not included in their crime statistics during the three most recent calendar years.

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From “I love you babe” to “leave me alone” – Romantic Relationship Breakups on Twitter

October 13, 2014 Comments off

From “I love you babe” to “leave me alone” – Romantic Relationship Breakups on Twitter
Source: arXiv.org

We use public data from Twitter to study the breakups of the romantic relationships of 661 couples. Couples are identified through profile references such as @user1 writing “@user2 is the best boyfriend ever!!”. Using this data set we find evidence for a number of existing hypotheses describing psychological processes including (i) pre-relationship closeness being indicative of post-relationship closeness, (ii) “stonewalling”, i.e., ignoring messages by a partner, being indicative of a pending breakup, and (iii) post-breakup depression. We also observe a previously undocumented phenomenon of “batch un-friending and being un-friended” where users who break up experience sudden drops of 15-20 followers and friends. Our work shows that public Twitter data can be used to gain new insights into psychological processes surrounding relationship dissolutions, something that most people go through at least once in their lifetime.

Hat tip: ResearchBuzz

When Online Dating Partners Meet Offline: The Effect of Modality Switching on Relational Communication Between Online Daters

September 22, 2014 Comments off

When Online Dating Partners Meet Offline: The Effect of Modality Switching on Relational Communication Between Online Daters
Source: Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication

Despite the popularity of online dating sites, little is known about what occurs when online dating partners choose to communicate offline. Drawing upon the modality switching perspective, the present study assessed a national sample of online daters to determine whether face-to-face (FtF) relational outcomes could be predicted by the amount of online communication prior to the initial FtF meeting. Results were consistent with the hypothesized curvilinear relationship between the amount of online communication and perceptions of relational messages (intimacy, composure, informality, social orientation), forecasts of the future of the relationship, and information seeking behavior when meeting their partner FtF. The results provide support for the modality switching perspective, and offer important insight for online daters.

Prevalence and Characteristics of Sexual Violence, Stalking, and Intimate Partner Violence Victimization — National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, United States, 2011

September 11, 2014 Comments off

Prevalence and Characteristics of Sexual Violence, Stalking, and Intimate Partner Violence Victimization — National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, United States, 2011
Source: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (CDC)

Sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence are public health problems known to have a negative impact on millions of persons in the United States each year, not only by way of immediate harm but also through negative long-term health impacts. Before implementation of the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) in 2010, the most recent detailed national data on the public health burden from these forms of violence were obtained from the National Violence against Women Survey conducted during 1995–1996.

This report examines sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence victimization using data from 2011. The report describes the overall prevalence of sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence victimization; racial/ethnic variation in prevalence; how types of perpetrators vary by violence type; and the age at which victimization typically begins. For intimate partner violence, the report also examines a range of negative impacts experienced as a result of victimization, including the need for services.

Evolution of the Un-Wed Mother

September 10, 2014 Comments off

Evolution of the Un-Wed Mother
Source: Dominican University of California

According to the National Vital Statistics System, since the 1980’s, there has been a dramatic increase of unmarried pregnancies, close to an 80% increase. Drawing predominantly on historical information, and interviews with a multi-generational group of unmarried mothers, my research will show that although there are socio-economic factors which contribute to this phenomenon, the overwhelming factor is the increase in individualism, and that over the decades, unmarried women have evolved. With the release of societal pressures that once deemed them “fallen women” they no longer feel that they have to be married in order to provide a good life for their children.

Multiraciality in Cyberspace: Honorary Whiteness, Hypo-descent or Something Else?

September 5, 2014 Comments off

Multiraciality in Cyberspace: Honorary Whiteness, Hypo-descent or Something Else?
Source: University of Massachusetts-Amherst (Lundquist)

Mixed-race studies is a growing area of sociological inquiry, yet little is known concerning how individuals treat or perceive the growing U.S. population that identify with multiple racial categories. Using data from one of the largest dating websites in the United States, we respond to this gap in the literature and examine multiracial identification as an interactive process. We assess how the specific multiracial makeup of potential partners effect the responsiveness of online monoracial daters of varying racial identities and find that Honorary Whiteness is the main driving force behind monoracials’ treatment of multiracial users; our findings indicate that all multiracial daters receive a premium in preference relative to their monoracial counterparts; however, there is important racial subgroup variation. Asian-white daters in particular are afforded a heightened status in online dating by whites, while black multiracials are treated as an in-between group. For a few specific multiracial-gender groups we also discover an unexpected result that we call the Bonus effect, where multiracial daters receive a preferred status above all groups, including whites.

Criminalizing Revenge Porn

September 3, 2014 Comments off

Criminalizing Revenge Porn
Source: University of Maryland (Carey School of Law)

Violations of sexual privacy, notably the non-consensual publication of sexually graphic images in violation of someone’s trust, deserve criminal punishment. They deny subjects’ ability to decide if and when they are sexually exposed to the public and undermine trust needed for intimate relationships. Then too they produce grave emotional and dignitary harms, exact steep financial costs, and increase the risks of physical assault. A narrowly and carefully crafted criminal statute can comport with the First Amendment. The criminalization of revenge porn is necessary to protect against devastating privacy invasions that chill self-expression and ruin lives.

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