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Archive for the ‘U.S. Department of Homeland Security’ Category

DHS — Refugees and Asylees 2013

October 14, 2014 Comments off

Refugees and Asylees 2013
Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security

The United States provides refuge to persons who have been persecuted or have well-founded fear of persecution through two programs: one for refugees (persons outside the U.S. and their immediate relatives) and one for asylees (persons in the U.S. and their immediate relatives).

This Office of Immigration Statistics Annual Flow Report provides information on the number of persons admitted to the United States as refugees or granted asylum in the United States in 2013.

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CBO — Understanding FEMA’s Rate-Setting Methods for the National Flood Insurance Program (presentation)

October 10, 2014 Comments off

Understanding FEMA’s Rate-Setting Methods for the National Flood Insurance Program
Source: Congressional Budget Office

Program Goals

  • Help property owners recover from floods
  • Limit federal costs
  • Reduce flood losses – Better incentives for property owners – Better floodplain management
  • Allow floodplains to play their natural beneficial roles

Homeland Security OIG — Improvements Continue at Detention Centers

October 8, 2014 Comments off

Improvements Continue at Detention Centers (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of Inspector General

The latest in a series of spot inspections by the Office of Inspector General (OIG), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), found overall improvement, several recurring problems and declining populations at detention facilities for unaccompanied alien children (UAC) operated by Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

+ Full Report (PDF)

DHS OIG — Flawed FEMA System Could Hamper Disaster Relief

October 7, 2014 Comments off

Flawed FEMA System Could Hamper Disaster Relief (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of Inspector General

After spending more than $247 million on a high-tech system, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) may still not be able to efficiently deliver emergency supplies to survivors of a catastrophic disaster, an Office of Inspector General (OIG) audit has found.

OIG Report 14-151, “FEMA’s Logistics Supply Chain Management System May Not Be Effective During a Catastrophic Disaster,” found the system, developed over nine years, cannot interface with those of its partners and suppliers, making it difficult to track and locate emergency supplies. The report also noted that FEMA does not have enough trained employees to efficiently operate the system.

+ Full Report (PDF)

Department of Homeland Security Privacy Office: 2014 Annual Report to Congress

October 3, 2014 Comments off

Department of Homeland Security Privacy Office: 2014 Annual Report to Congress (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security

The DHS Privacy Office’s (Privacy Office or Office) mission is to protect the privacy of all individuals by embedding and enforcing privacy protections and transparency in all DHS activities. This report, covering the period from July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014, catalogues the Office’s continued success in safeguarding individual privacy while supporting the DHS mission.

Hat tip: GP

FEMA Miscalculation Costs Taxpayers $12 Million

October 1, 2014 Comments off

FEMA Miscalculation Costs Taxpayers $12 Million (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of Inspector General

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) officials did not follow their own disaster relief guidelines in response to 2008 flooding in Cedar Rapids, IA, resulting in a loss to taxpayers of more than $12 million, according to a new report by the Office of Inspector General (OIG), Department of Homeland Security.

OIG auditors determined that officials did not correctly follow FEMA’s “50 Percent Rule” in determining that four flood-damaged structures in Cedar Rapids be replaced, rather than repaired. The rule states that Federal funds can be used to replace damaged structures only when the cost of repairs meets or exceeds 50 percent of the repair costs. The OIG found that none of the four structures – the Main Library, two animal control facilities and a park maintenance shop – met the 50 percent threshold and could have been repaired for a total of $8.57 million. FEMA granted the city more than $20.6 million to replace the buildings.

“FEMA needs to improve and refine its calculations in regard to repairing or replacing damaged facilities,” said Inspector General John Roth. “We have made several recommendations that will assist FEMA in that process and hopefully prevent misspending on disaster relief.”

+ Full Report (PDF)

DHS OIG — DHS Does Not Adequately Manage or Have Enforcement Authority Over Its Components’ Vehicle Fleet Operations

September 25, 2014 Comments off

DHS Does Not Adequately Manage or Have Enforcement Authority Over Its Components’ Vehicle Fleet Operations (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of Inspector General

In fiscal year 2012, Federal agency fleets consisted of more than 650,000 motor vehicles around the world. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) had the second largest civilian motor vehicle fleet in the Federal Government, owning or leasing about 56,000 vehicles, with reported annual operating costs of about $534 million. Our audit objective was to determine whether, for fiscal year 2012, DHS met requirements to rightͲsize its motor vehicle fleet composition, eliminate underused vehicles, and acquire vehicles that reduce petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions.

DHS does not adequately manage or have the enforcement authority over its components’ fleet operations to ensure that its motor vehicle fleet composition is rightͲ sized. Each DHS component manages its own vehicle fleet, making it difficult for the DHS Fleet Manager to provide adequate oversight and ensure compliance with Federal laws, regulations, policies, and directives. Although the Department oversees and approves the components’ leasing of vehicles, it does not oversee and approve the acquisition of componentͲowned vehicles. In fiscal year 2012, not all acquisitions were alternative fuel vehicles, as required by DHS policy.

The Department does not have a centralized fleet management information system. For reporting on its motor vehicle fleet inventory, DHS must rely on multiple information systems that contain inaccurate and incomplete vehicle data from the components. In fiscal year 2012, all of the component vehicle fleets we reviewed included underused vehicles, but DHS did not ensure the components justified retaining the vehicles or removed them from their fleets. In that fiscal year, we estimate that operating these underused vehicles cost between $35.3 million and $48.6 million. For these reasons, DHS cannot ensure its vehicle fleet composition is cost efficient, complies with departmental requirements, and has the correct number of motor vehicles to accomplish its mission.

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