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Archive for the ‘financial crime and fraud’ Category

New From the GAO

November 24, 2014 Comments off

New GAO Reports
Source: Government Accountability Office
1. Group Purchasing Organizations: Funding Structure Has Potential Implications for Medicare Costs. GAO-15-13, October 24.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-15-13
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/666643.pdf

2. Medicare Program Integrity: CMS Pursues Many Practices to Address Prescription Drug Fraud, Waste, and Abuse. GAO-15-66, October 24.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-15-66
Highlights – http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/666648.pdf

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NCJRS — Special Feature: Fraud Awareness

November 19, 2014 Comments off

Special Feature: Fraud Awareness
Source: National Criminal Justice Reference Service

A single scam can destroy a company, devastate families by wiping out their life savings, or cost investors billions of dollars (or even all three). Additionally, today’s fraud schemes are more sophisticated than ever (White Collar Crime, Federal Bureau of Investigation, retrieved October 2014).

Results of a Federal Trade Commission (FTC) survey of fraud in the United States during 2011 showed that an estimated 25.6 million adults – 10.8 percent of the adult population – were victims of fraud. Most consumers bought fraudulent items via the Internet with telephone purchases ranking second (Consumer Fraud in the United States, 2011: The Third FTC Survey, Federal Trade Commission, April 2013).

In an effort to educate businesses and the public about the impact of fraud, as well as to promote basic steps that can be taken to recognize, report, and reduce the risk of becoming a victim of fraudulent activities, NCJRS presents this online compilation of resources addressing the topic.

Encyclopedia of Ethical Failure — Updated October 2014

November 17, 2014 Comments off

Encyclopedia of Ethical Failure — Updated October 2014 (Word)
Source: U.S. Department of Defense, Office of General Counsel

The Standards of Conduct Office of the Department of Defense General Counsel’s Office has assembled the following selection of cases of ethical failure for use as a training tool. Our goal is to provide DoD personnel with real examples of Federal employees who have intentionally or unwittingly violated the standards of conduct. Some cases are humorous, some sad, and all are real. Some will anger you as a Federal employee and some will anger you as an American taxpayer.

Please pay particular attention to the multiple jail and probation sentences, fines, employment terminations and other sanctions that were taken as a result of these ethical failures. Violations of many ethical standards involve criminal statutes. Protect yourself and your employees by learning what you need to know and accessing your Agency ethics counselor if you become unsure of the proper course of conduct. Be sure to access them before you take action regarding the issue in question. Many of the cases displayed in this collection could have been avoided completely if the offender had taken this simple precaution.

The cases have been arranged according to offense for ease of access. Feel free to reproduce and use them as you like in your ethics training program. For example – you may be conducting a training session regarding political activities. Feel free to copy and paste a case or two into your slideshow or handout – or use them as examples or discussion problems. If you have a case you would like to make available for inclusion in a future update of this collection, please email it to OSD.SOCO@MAIL.MIL or you may fax it to (703) 695-4970.

See previous: Encyclopedia of Ethical Failure (Updated July 2013)

CRS — Cybercrime: An Overview of the Federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Statute and Related Federal Criminal Laws (October 15, 2014)

November 3, 2014 Comments off

Cybercrime: An Overview of the Federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Statute and Related Federal Criminal Laws (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via Federation of American Scientists)

The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), 18 U.S.C. 1030, outlaws conduct that victimizes computer systems. It is a cyber security law. It protects federal computers, bank computers, and computers connected to the Internet. It shields them from trespassing, threats, damage, espionage, and from being corruptly used as instruments of fraud. It is not a comprehensive provision, but instead it fills cracks and gaps in the protection afforded by other federal criminal laws. This is a brief sketch of CFAA and some of its federal statutory companions, including the amendments found in the Identity Theft Enforcement and Restitution Act, P.L. 110-326, 122 Stat. 3560 (2008).

See also: JPMorgan Data Breach Involves Information on 76 Million Households, 7 Million Small Businesses (October 23, 2014) (PDF)

Identity Theft: Who’s At Risk?

October 27, 2014 Comments off

Identity Theft: Who’s At Risk?
Source: AARP Research

This AARP Fraud Watch Network study aimed to assess Americans’ habits around protecting their personal and financial information. Overall, the study finds that many are not taking precautions necessary to reduce their risk of identity theft.

Identity Theft Legislation 2014

October 23, 2014 Comments off

Identity Theft Legislation 2014
Source: National Conference of State Legislatures

Identity theft occurs when someone uses another person’s identifying information, like a person’s name, Social Security number, or credit card number or other financial information, without permission, to commit fraud or other crimes. Identity theft continues to generate the most complaints with the Federal Trade Commission.

The chart below lists state legislation introduced or pending during the 2014 legislative session relating to identity theft. Legislation in 30 states and Puerto Rico is pending in the 2014 legislative session and includes legislation regarding criminal penalties, identity theft passports and identity theft prevention. Nineteen bills have been enacted in 2014.

CBO — How Initiatives to Reduce Fraud in Federal Health Care Programs Affect the Budget

October 22, 2014 Comments off

How Initiatives to Reduce Fraud in Federal Health Care Programs Affect the Budget
Source: Congressional Budget Office

Observers often cite fraud as an important contributor to high health care spending, particularly in federal programs. This report describes how CBO estimates the budgetary effects of legislative proposals to reduce fraud in Medicare, Medicaid, and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and how those estimates are used in the Congressional budget process.

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