Archive

Archive for the ‘National Institutes of Health’ Category

Complementary and Integrative Approaches for ADHD

June 19, 2015 Comments off

Complementary and Integrative Approaches for ADHD
Source: National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

Surveys estimate that as many as 9 percent of American children and 4 percent of adults have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Although stimulant medications have been shown to be helpful for at least 70 percent of children with ADHD, many adults and children use complementary health approaches such as omega-3 fatty acids, melatonin, herbs and other dietary supplements, special diets, neurofeedback, and several mind and body practices, including acupuncture and meditation to control ADHD symptoms. Many of these complementary health approaches have been studied for ADHD, but none has been conclusively shown to be more effective than conventional therapies.

This issue of the digest provides information on what the science says about some of these complementary approaches for ADHD.

See also: 7 Things To Know About Complementary Health Approaches for ADHD

NIH approves strategic vision to transform National Library of Medicine

June 12, 2015 Comments off

NIH approves strategic vision to transform National Library of Medicine
Source: National Institutes of Health

National Institutes of Health Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., today approved a federal report that lays out the long-term scientific vision for the NIH’s National Library of Medicine (NLM), the world’s largest biomedical library.

In summary, the ACD envisioned NLM to be a modernized conceptualization of a library and formulated a series of recommendations to guide its future:

  • Continually evolve to remain a leader in assimilating and disseminating accessible and authoritative biomedical research findings and trusted health information to the public, healthcare professionals, and researchers worldwide.
  • Lead efforts to support and catalyze open science, data sharing, and research reproducibility, striving to promote the concept that biomedical information and its transparent analysis are public goods.
  • Be the intellectual and programmatic epicenter for data science at NIH, including becoming the center of intellectual and programmatic activities in biomedical data science, and stimulate its advancement throughout biomedical research and application.
  • Strengthen its role in fostering the future generation of professionals in biomedical informatics, data science, library sciences, and related disciplines through sustained and focused training efforts.
  • Maintain, preserve, and make accessible the nation’s historical efforts in advancing biomedical research and medicine, thereby ensuring that this legacy is both safe and accessible for long-term use.
  • Have new NLM leadership evaluate what talent, resources, and organizational structures are required to ensure NLM can fully achieve its mission and best allocate its resources.

Complementary and Integrative Approaches for Cancer Symptoms and Treatment Side Effects

June 3, 2015 Comments off

Complementary and Integrative Approaches for Cancer Symptoms and Treatment Side Effects
Source: National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

Many people who have been diagnosed with cancer use complementary health approaches. According to the 2007 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), which included a comprehensive survey on the use of complementary health approaches by Americans, 65 percent of respondents who had ever been diagnosed with cancer had used complementary approaches. Those who had been diagnosed with cancer were more likely than others to have used complementary approaches for general wellness, immune enhancement, and pain management.

A substantial amount of evidence suggests that some complementary health approaches, such as acupuncture, massage therapy, mindfulness-based stress reduction, and yoga may help to manage some cancer symptoms and side effects of treatment. For other complementary approaches (e.g., natural products), the evidence is more limited. This issue of the digest provides information on the evidence base on complementary and integrative health approaches for cancer-related symptoms and treatment side effects.

See also: 6 Things You Need To Know About Cancer and Complementary Health Approaches

Hepatitis C: A Focus on Dietary Supplements

April 7, 2015 Comments off

Hepatitis C: A Focus on Dietary Supplements
Source: National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)

Hepatitis C is a liver disease caused by a virus. It’s usually chronic (long-lasting), but most people don’t have any symptoms until the virus causes liver damage, which can take 10 or more years to happen. Without medical treatment, chronic hepatitis C can eventually cause liver cancer or liver failure. Conventional medical treatments are available for chronic hepatitis C. Some people with hepatitis C also try complementary health approaches, especially dietary supplements. This fact sheet provides basic information on hepatitis C, summarizes scientific research on selected supplements, and suggests sources for additional information.

NCCIH Clinical Digest: Children’s Use of Complementary Health Approaches

February 24, 2015 Comments off

NCCIH Clinical Digest: Children’s Use of Complementary Health Approaches
Source: National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)

A new report based on data from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)* found that nearly 12 percent of children aged 4 to 17 years use complementary health approaches. Although this was not a significant change from the previous survey in 2007, there were significant increases in children’s use of yoga, fish oil, and melatonin. The complementary health approach most commonly used by children was natural products (dietary supplements other than vitamins and minerals) at almost one-quarter the adult rate (4.9 percent vs. 17.6 percent). This issue of the digest highlights findings from the survey, which aims to provide the most current and comprehensive picture of U.S. children’s use of complementary health approaches, and may give you insight into your own patients’ use of these products and practices.

*The complementary health questionnaire was developed by NIH’s National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (formerly NCCAM) and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics. The questionnaire is administered every 5 years as part of the NHIS, an annual study in which tens of thousands of Americans are interviewed about their health- and illness-related experiences. The 2012 survey results are based on combined data from 17,321 interviews with a knowledgeable adult about children aged 4 to 17 years.

See: Children and Complementary Health Approaches

Spinal Manipulation

February 23, 2015 Comments off

Spinal Manipulation
Source: National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)

Spinal manipulation—sometimes called “spinal manipulative therapy”—is practiced by health care professionals such as chiropractors, osteopathic physicians, naturopathic physicians, physical therapists, and some medical doctors. Practitioners perform spinal manipulation by using their hands or a device to apply a controlled force to a joint of the spine. The amount of force applied depends on the form of manipulation used. The goal of the treatment is to relieve pain and improve physical functioning.

See also: Chiropractic: An Introduction

Strengthening Collaborations With the U.S. Department of Defense and U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: Effectiveness Research on Mind and Body Interventions

February 23, 2015 Comments off

Strengthening Collaborations With the U.S. Department of Defense and U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: Effectiveness Research on Mind and Body Interventions
Source: National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)
From press release:

The feasibility of conducting larger-scale research studies on nondrug approaches for pain management in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) should be assessed by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This recommendation was delivered in a report by a working group of the Center’s Advisory Council.

“Chronic pain is a major public health problem that affects more than 100 million Americans, and research shows that it may disproportionately affect military personnel and Veterans,” said Lloyd Michener, M.D., professor and chair, Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina; chair of the working group. “The high rates of chronic pain in the military and Veteran populations are alarming. New strategies for managing this widespread condition are urgently needed.”

The working group recommended that the proposed research should:

  • Assess the impact of pain on patient function and quality of life as primary outcome measures, with changes in the use of opioids and other drugs as a secondary outcome;
  • Evaluate an integrated package of nondrug treatments, an integrative model of care, or a holistic approach to care rather than focusing on individual complementary health approaches;
  • Focus on patients in the early stages of chronic pain;
  • Leverage natural experiments and existing resources whenever possible; and
  • Be pragmatic and embedded in the delivery of care.
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,049 other followers