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Archive for the ‘National Institutes of Health’ Category

Acupuncture Research – Areas of High and Low Programmatic Priorities

April 15, 2014 Comments off

Acupuncture Research – Areas of High and Low Programmatic Priorities
Source: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

On this page:

  • Published Research
  • Areas of High Programmatic Priority
  • Areas of Low Programmatic Priority
  • NCCAM Contact Information
  • Selected References
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NCCAM Clinical Digest: Chronic Low-Back Pain and Complementary Health Approaches

April 4, 2014 Comments off

NCCAM Clinical Digest: Chronic Low-Back Pain and Complementary Health Approaches
Source: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

This issue of the digest summarizes current scientific evidence about spinal manipulation, acupuncture, massage, and yoga, the complementary approaches most often used by people for chronic low back pain.

NIH releases comprehensive new data outlining Hispanic/Latino health and habits

February 27, 2014 Comments off

NIH releases comprehensive new data outlining Hispanic/Latino health and habits
Source: National Institutes of Health

A comprehensive health and lifestyle analysis of people from a range of Hispanic/ Latino origins shows that this segment of the U.S. population is diverse, not only in ancestry, culture, and economic status, but also in the prevalence of several diseases, risk factors, and lifestyle habits.

These health data are derived from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), a landmark study that enrolled about 16,415 Hispanic/Latino adults living in San Diego, Chicago, Miami, and the Bronx, N.Y., who self-identified with Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, or South American origins. These new findings have been compiled and published as the Hispanic Community Health Study Data Book: A Report to the Communities.

Massage Therapy for Health Purposes: What You Need To Know

February 27, 2014 Comments off

Massage Therapy for Health Purposes: What You Need To Know
Source: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

A lot of the scientific research on massage therapy is preliminary or conflicting, but much of the evidence points toward beneficial effects on pain and other symptoms associated with a number of different conditions. Much of the evidence suggests that these effects are short term and that people need to keep getting massages for the benefits to continue.

Hallucinogens and Dissociative Drugs

February 17, 2014 Comments off

Hallucinogens and Dissociative Drugs
Source: National Institute on Drug Abuse

Offers the latest research findings on hallucinogens and dissociative drugs, describing what they are, how they are abused, and basic facts about different drugs within this classification of drugs.

Credentialing: Understanding the Education, Training, Regulation, and Licensing of Complementary Health Practitioners

February 14, 2014 Comments off

Credentialing: Understanding the Education, Training, Regulation, and Licensing of Complementary Health Practitioners
Source: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Health care providers’ credentials—the licenses, certificates, and diplomas on their office walls—tell us about their professional qualifications to advise and treat us. In the United States, local and state governments and professional organizations establish the credentials that complementary health practitioners need to treat patients. This fact sheet provides a general overview of the credentialing of practitioners and suggests sources for additional information.

Chronic Pain and Complementary Health Approaches: What You Need To Know

February 12, 2014 Comments off

Chronic Pain and Complementary Health Approaches: What You Need To Know
Source: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

What’s the Bottom Line?

Are complementary health approaches for chronic pain safe?
There’s no simple answer to this question. Although many of the complementary approaches studied for chronic pain have good safety records, that doesn’t mean that they’re risk-free for everyone. Your age, health, special circumstances (such as pregnancy), and medicines or supplements that you take may affect the safety of complementary approaches.

Are any complementary health approaches for chronic pain effective?
The currently available evidence is not strong enough to allow definite conclusions to be reached about whether complementary approaches are effective for chronic pain. However, a growing body of scientific evidence suggests that some of these approaches, such as massage, spinal manipulation, and yoga, may help to manage some painful conditions.

CRS — Brief History of NIH Funding: Fact Sheet

January 16, 2014 Comments off

Brief History of NIH Funding: Fact Sheet (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via Federation of American Scientists)

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the primary federal agency charged with conducting and supporting biomedical and behavioral research. Its activities cover a wide range of basic, clinical, and translational research, focused on particular diseases, areas of human health and development, or more fundamental aspects of biomedical research. Its mission also includes research training and health information collection and dissemination. About 83% of the NIH budget funds extramural research through grants, contracts, and other awards. This funding supports research performed by more than 300,000 non-federal scientists and technical personnel who work at more than 2,500 universities, hospitals, medical schools, and other research institutions around the country and abroad. About 11% of the agency’s budget supports intramural research performed by NIH scientists and non-employee trainees in the NIH laboratories and Clinical Center. The remaining 6% funds research management, support, and facilities’ needs.

Almost all of NIH’s funding is provided in the annual Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies appropriations act. In addition to its regular annual appropriations, NIH received a total of $10.4 billion in supplemental FY2009 appropriations in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 (P.L. 111-5). ARRA funds were made available for obligation for two years; $4.95 billion was obligated in FY2009, and $5.45 billion in FY2010.

Seeking Drug Abuse Treatment: Know What To Ask

September 26, 2013 Comments off

Seeking Drug Abuse Treatment: Know What To Ask
Source: National Institute on Drug Abuse

Offers guidance in seeking drug abuse treatment and lists five questions to ask when searching for a treatment program.

Ayurvedic Medicine: An Introduction

September 19, 2013 Comments off

Ayurvedic Medicine: An Introduction
Source: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)

Ayurvedic medicine (also called Ayurveda) is one of the world’s oldest medical systems. It originated in India more than 3,000 years ago and remains one of the country’s traditional health care systems. Its concepts about health and disease promote the use of herbal compounds, special diets, and other unique health practices. India’s government and other institutes throughout the world support clinical and laboratory research on Ayurvedic medicine, within the context of the Eastern belief system. But Ayurvedic medicine is not widely studied as part of conventional (Western) medicine. This fact sheet provides a general overview of Ayurvedic medicine and suggests sources for additional information.

Finding and Evaluating Online Resources on Complementary Health Approaches

September 18, 2013 Comments off

Finding and Evaluating Online Resources on Complementary Health Approaches
Source: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)

The number of Web sites offering health-related resources—including information about complementary health approaches (often called complementary and alternative medicine)—grows every day. Social media sites have also become an important source of online health information for some people. Many online health resources are useful, but others may present information that is inaccurate or misleading, so it’s important to find sources you can trust and to know how to evaluate their content. This guide provides help for finding reliable Web sites and outlines things to consider in evaluating health information from Web sites and social media sources.

Clinical Digest — Spotlight on a Modality: Omega-3 Fatty Acids

September 9, 2013 Comments off

Clinical Digest — Spotlight on a Modality: Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Source: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Omega-3 fatty acids have been in the news lately, after a new study raises concern about the association of omega-3s and an increased risk of prostate cancer. Omega-3s are a popular supplement used by many Americans. In fact, according to the 2007 National Health Interview Survey, which included a comprehensive survey on the use of complementary health practices by Americans, fish oil/omega-3/DHA supplements are the natural product (excluding vitamins and minerals) most commonly taken by adults, and the second most commonly taken by children.

Moderate evidence has emerged about the health benefits of consuming seafood, but the health benefits of omega-3s in supplement form are less clear. For example, the findings of individual studies on omega-3 supplements and heart disease have been inconsistent, and in 2012, two combined analyses of the results of these studies did not find convincing evidence that omega-3s protect against heart disease.

There is some evidence that omega-3s are modestly helpful in relieving symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis. Omega-3s may also be helpful for age-related macular degeneration (AMD; an eye disease that can cause loss of vision in older people). For most other conditions for which omega-3s are being studied, definitive conclusions cannot yet be reached. This issue of the digest provides information on what the science says about omega-3’s effectiveness and safety for several conditions for which there is the most evidence, including heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, infant development, and diseases of the eye and brain.

Passionflower

August 19, 2013 Comments off

Passionflower
Source: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)

This fact sheet provides basic information about passionflower—common names, what the science says, potential side effects and cautions, and resources for more information.

Sixteenth-century Spanish explorers learned of passionflower in Peru. Native peoples of the Americas used passionflower for boils, wounds, earaches, and liver problems. Today, passionflower is promoted as a folk or traditional remedy for anxiety, stress, and sleep, as well as for heart ailments, asthma, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, burns, and hemorrhoids.

Passionflower is available dried (which can be used to make tea), or as liquid extract, capsules, or tablets.

Spotlight on a Modality: Oral Probiotics

July 31, 2013 Comments off

Spotlight on a Modality: Oral Probiotics
Source: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)

Probiotics are live microorganisms (e.g., bacteria) that are either the same as or similar to microorganisms found naturally in the human body and may be beneficial to health. Probiotics are available to consumers in oral products such as dietary supplements and yogurts, as well as other products such as suppositories and creams. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not approved any health claims for probiotics.

There is mounting evidence that probiotics can have beneficial effects on human health. Possible mechanisms under active investigation include altering the intestinal “microecology” (e.g., reducing harmful organisms in the intestine), producing antimicrobial compounds (substances that destroy or suppress the growth of microorganisms), and stimulating the body’s immune response.

Probiotics commonly used in the United States include Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. There are many specific types of bacteria within each of these two broad groups, and health benefits associated with one type may not hold true for others. This issue of the digest provides information on what the science says about probiotics, with an emphasis on oral products.

Backgrounder — Homeopathy: An Introduction

July 30, 2013 Comments off

Homeopathy: An Introduction
Source: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)

Key Points

  • There is little evidence to support homeopathy as an effective treatment for any specific condition.
  • Although people sometimes assume that all homeopathic remedies are highly diluted and therefore unlikely to cause harm, some products labeled as homeopathic can contain substantial amounts of active ingredients and therefore could cause side effects and drug interactions.
  • Homeopathic remedies are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, FDA does not evaluate the remedies for safety or effectiveness.
  • Several key concepts of homeopathy are inconsistent with fundamental concepts of chemistry and physics. There are significant challenges in carrying out rigorous clinical research on homeopathic remedies.
  • Tell all your health care providers about any complementary health practices you use. Give them a full picture of all you do to manage your health. This will help ensure coordinated and safe care.

Asthma and Complementary Health Approaches

July 8, 2013 Comments off

Asthma and Complementary Health Approaches
Source: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)

Asthma is a chronic lung disease that affects people of all ages. It causes episodes of wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath, and chest tightness. Although there is no cure, most people with asthma are able to manage the disease with medications and behavioral changes.

Researchers also are studying various complementary health approaches for asthma relief. This fact sheet provides basic information about asthma, summarizes scientific research on the effectiveness and safety of complementary health approaches for asthma, and suggests sources for additional information.

Cancer and Complementary Health Approaches

July 3, 2013 Comments off

Cancer and Complementary Health Approaches
Source: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)

People with cancer want to do everything they can to combat the disease, manage its symptoms, and cope with the side effects of treatment. Many turn to complementary health approaches, including natural products, such as herbs (botanicals) and other dietary supplements, and mind and body practices, such as acupuncture, massage, and yoga.

This fact sheet was produced through a collaboration between the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI). It provides an introductory overview of complementary health approaches that have been studied for cancer prevention, treatment of the disease, or symptom management, including what the science says about their effectiveness and any concerns that have been raised about their safety.

NCCAM Clinical Digest: Weight Loss and Complementary Health Practices

June 21, 2013 Comments off

NCCAM Clinical Digest: Weight Loss and Complementary Health Practices

Source: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

More than two-thirds of adults and one-third of children in the United States are overweight or obese. Achieving a healthy weight, eating a healthy diet, and being physically active can help lower cholesterol, blood pressure, and blood sugar—and may also help prevent weight-related diseases, such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes, as you know.

Your patients may ask you about complementary health approaches for losing weight, such as dietary supplements marketed for weight loss, which are available in supermarkets, pharmacies, health food stores, and the Internet. Although patients may be tempted by the “quick fix” claims of these products, most of these products haven’t been proven safe or effective. Two important safety concerns about dietary supplements for weight loss are the possibilities of drug interactions and product contamination. This issue provides information on “what the science says” about a few popular dietary supplements marketed for weight loss, including acai, bitter orange, ephedra, and green tea, as well as several mind and body practices that are being studied for weight loss.

Seasonal Allergies and Complementary Health Practices

May 6, 2013 Comments off

Seasonal Allergies and Complementary Health Practices

Source: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Seasonal allergies, also called “hay fever,” are a common chronic medical problem. At least 17.7 million American adults (7.8 percent of the adult population) and 7 million children (about 9 percent of children) have seasonal allergies.

People manage seasonal allergies by taking medication, avoiding exposure to the substances that trigger their allergic reactions, having a series of “allergy shots” (a form of immunotherapy) or using various complementary approaches. According to the 2007 National Health Interview Survey, “respiratory allergy” is among the 15 conditions for which children in the United States use complementary approaches most frequently. This issue of the Digest provides information on what the science says about several complementary health approaches for seasonal allergies, such as saline nasal irrigation, butterbur, honey, acupuncture, and other practices.

Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Ginkgo Biloba Extract (CASRN 90045-36-6) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1/N Mice

April 22, 2013 Comments off

Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Ginkgo Biloba Extract (CASRN 90045-36-6) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1/N Mice

Source: National Institutes of Health (National Toxicology Program)

Under the conditions of these 2-year gavage studies, there was some evidence of carcinogenic activity of Ginkgo biloba extract in male F344/N rats based on increased incidences of thyroid gland follicular cell adenoma. The increased incidences of mononuclear cell leukemia and hepatocellular adenoma may have been related to Ginkgo biloba extract administration. There was some evidence of carcinogenic activity of Ginkgo biloba extract in female F344/N rats based on increased incidences of thyroid gland follicular cell neoplasms. Increased occurrence of respiratory epithelium adenomas in the nose may have been related to Ginkgo biloba extract administration. There was clear evidence of carcinogenic activity of Ginkgo biloba extract in male B6C3F1/N mice based on increased incidences of hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatoblastoma. The increased incidences of thyroid gland follicular cell adenoma were also related to Ginkgo biloba extract administration. There was clear evidence of carcinogenic activity of Ginkgo biloba extract in female B6C3F1/N mice based on increased incidences of hepatocellular adenoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and hepatoblastoma.

Administration of Ginkgo biloba extract resulted in increased incidences of nonneoplastic lesions in the liver, thyroid gland, and nose of male and female rats and mice and the forestomach of male and female mice. Increased severity of nephropathy in male rats was also due to administration of Ginkgo biloba extract.

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