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Archive for the ‘National Institutes of Health’ Category

NCCAM Clinical Digest: Stress and Relaxation Techniques

January 6, 2015 Comments off

NCCAM Clinical Digest: Stress and Relaxation Techniques
Source: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Relaxation techniques may be helpful in managing a variety of health conditions, including anxiety associated with illnesses or medical procedures, insomnia, labor pain, chemotherapy-induced nausea, and temporomandibular joint dysfunction. For some of these conditions, relaxation techniques are used as an adjunct to other forms of treatment. Relaxation techniques have also been studied for other conditions, but either they haven’t been shown to be useful, research results have been inconsistent, or the evidence is limited.

Energy Drinks

November 20, 2014 Comments off

Energy Drinks
Source: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)

Bottom Line:

  • Although there’s very limited data that caffeine-containing energy drinks may temporarily improve alertness and physical endurance, evidence that they enhance strength or power is lacking. More important, they can be dangerous because large amounts of caffeine may cause serious heart rhythm, blood flow, and blood pressure problems.
  • There’s not enough evidence to determine the effects of additives other than caffeine in energy drinks.
  • The amounts of caffeine in energy drinks vary widely, and the actual caffeine content may not be identified easily.

NCCAM Clinical Digest: Yoga for Health

November 5, 2014 Comments off

NCCAM Clinical Digest: Yoga for Health
Source: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)

This issue of the digest summarizes current scientific evidence about yoga for health conditions, including chronic low-back pain, asthma, and arthritis.

The scientific evidence to date suggests that a carefully adapted set of yoga poses may help reduce pain and improve function in people with chronic low-back pain. Studies also suggest that practicing yoga (as well as other forms of regular exercise) might confer other health benefits such as reducing heart rate and blood pressure, and may also help alleviate anxiety and depression. Other research suggests yoga’s deep breathing is not helpful for asthma, and studies looking at yoga and arthritis have had mixed results.

Recommended Practices, Protecting Temporary Workers

October 29, 2014 Comments off

Recommended Practices, Protecting Temporary Workers
Source: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)

OSHA and NIOSH recommend the following practices to staffing agencies and host employers so that they may better protect temporary workers through mutual cooperation and collaboration.

MedlinePlus Mobile Update: Full Access from Your Phone

October 24, 2014 Comments off

MedlinePlus Mobile Update: Full Access from Your Phone
Source: National Library of Medicine

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) released new versions of the MedlinePlus and MedlinePlus en español mobile sites in October 2014. The mobile sites can be accessed at http://m.medlineplus.gov and http://m.medlineplus.gov/spanish/, respectively (see Figure 1).

Like the original 2010 versions, these newly redesigned sites are optimized for mobile phones and tablets. Unlike the original mobile sites that contained only a subset of the information available on MedlinePlus, the new sites have all the content that you will find on MedlinePlus and MedlinePlus en español. They also have an improved design for easier use on mobile devices.

NIH — Ebola Outbreak 2014: Information Resources

October 8, 2014 Comments off

Ebola Outbreak 2014: Information Resources
Source: Disaster Information Management Research Center (National Library Medicine)
Includes:

  • U.S. Federal Organizations
  • U.S. Organizations
  • International Organizations
  • National Government (non-U.S.) Web Sites
  • Free Resources from Publishers for Medical Responders
  • Biomedical Journal Literature and Reports
  • Ebolavirus Information Sources
  • Situation Reports
  • Training
  • Social Media
  • Maps
  • Health Resources for the Public
  • Multi-Language Resources

Acupuncture: What You Need To Know

August 18, 2014 Comments off

Acupuncture: What You Need To Know
Source: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

What’s the Bottom Line?

How much do we know about acupuncture?
There have been extensive studies conducted on acupuncture, especially for back and neck pain, osteoarthritis/knee pain, and headache. However, researchers are only beginning to understand whether acupuncture can be helpful for various health conditions.

What do we know about the effectiveness of acupuncture?
Research suggests that acupuncture can help manage certain pain conditions, but evidence about its value for other health issues is uncertain.

What do we know about the safety of acupuncture?
Acupuncture is generally considered safe when performed by an experienced, well-trained practitioner using sterile needles. Improperly performed acupuncture can cause serious side effects.

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