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700,000 Americans Are Married to a Same-sex Spouse, Married Same-sex Couples More Likely to Raise Adopted, Foster Children and Are More Economically Secure, New Reports Show

May 8, 2015 Comments off

700,000 Americans Are Married to a Same-sex Spouse, Married Same-sex Couples More Likely to Raise Adopted, Foster Children and Are More Economically Secure, New Reports Show
Source: Williams Institute (UCLA School of Law)

According to Williams Institute Research Director Gary Gates’ assessment of a new preliminary estimate from Gallup, the number of legally married same-sex couples in the United States has more than doubled over the last year. The new figures suggest that, as of February 2015, more than 700,000 Americans are part of a married same-sex couple, implying that there are now about 350,000 married same-sex couples in the country. Estimates from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey had the figure at 130,000.

Two new research reports released today and authored by Gates show that same-sex couples, particularly married ones, are more likely to be raising adopted or foster children than their different-sex counterparts. The reports also found that same-sex couples with children have a lower median annual income than different-sex couples with kids but, like different-sex couples, married same-sex couples are more economically secure.

New Study Examines Human Services for Low-Income and At-Risk LGBT Populations

May 8, 2015 Comments off

New Study Examines Human Services for Low-Income and At-Risk LGBT Populations
Source: Williams Institute (UCLA School of Law) and Mathematica

Despite social and legal progress for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people in the United States, much about low-income and at-risk LGBT individuals and their participation in federal human service programs remains unknown. In fact, data suggest LGBT people may be disproportionately at risk of poor outcomes related to economic security and social well-being, compared to the general population.

To address this knowledge gap, Mathematica, in partnership with the Williams Institute at UCLA School of Law, conducted an assessment for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation. The project aims to help identify the current knowledge base and priorities for future research and, ultimately, strengthen services for low-income and at-risk LGBT people.

A report and related issue brief look at LGBT populations’ characteristics and interactions with human services and identify data gaps. The project focused on (1) income support and self-sufficiency programs for low-income families, (2) child welfare programs, and (3) programs for youth—especially services funded by ACF (assistance for runaway and homeless youth, and sexual health education for adolescents). Three additional briefs delve into recommendations for future research in these key

Comparing LGBT Rankings by Metro Area: 1990-2014

March 24, 2015 Comments off

Comparing LGBT Rankings by Metro Area: 1990-2014
Source: Williams Institute (UCLA School of Law)

For two decades, San Francisco, Austin and Seattle residents have been among the most likely in the country to report that they are part of a same-sex couple or are LGBT. But growing social acceptance of LGBT people, even in conservative Utah, may explain why Salt Lake City now ranks among metro areas with the highest proportion of residents who identify as LGBT.

This report analyzes data from a Gallup ranking of the 50 most populous U.S. metropolitan areas based on their percentage of residents who identified as LGBT in surveys conducted from 2012 to 2014 and 1990 Census data to rank the same metro areas by the number of same-sex couples per 1,000 households.

San Francisco, Austin and Seattle came in the top five on both rankings. Salt Lake City ranked 39th for its proportion of same-sex couples in 1990, and now ranks 7th in the proportion of LGBT adults today.

LGB Families and Relationships: Analyses of the 2013 National Health Interview Survey

October 27, 2014 Comments off

LGB Families and Relationships: Analyses of the 2013 National Health Interview Survey
Source: Williams Institute

The addition of a sexual orientation identity measure to the 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) offers a new data source to consider characteristics of families and explore differences among those led by same-sex and different-sex married and unmarried couples and LGB individuals who are not married or cohabiting. These analyses consider differences and similarities across these groups with regard to demographic characteristics including gender, age, race/ethnicity, educational attainment, geographic location, and child-rearing. In 2013, there were an estimated 690,000 same-sex couples in the US, of whom approximately 124,000 were married. In the last three years, the number of married same-sex couples in the US has increased by an estimated 50%. Same-sex couples were raising an estimated 200,000 children under age 18, of whom 30,000 are being raised by married same-sex parents. LGBT individuals who are not part of a couple are raising between 1.2 and 2 million children (depending on which estimate is used regarding the proportion of adults who are LGB or LGBT).

LGBT Demographics: Comparisons among population-based surveys

October 1, 2014 Comments off

LGBT Demographics: Comparisons among population-based surveys
Source: Williams Institute

This report uses four large, national, population-based surveys to consider the ways in which LGBT populations are demographically similar to or distinct from their non-LGBT counterparts in the United States. Comparisons of demographic characteristics are made among the surveys and, when possible, among sexual orientation identities to consider differences between those who identify as lesbian or gay and those who identify as bisexual (none of the surveys allow for separate identification of transgender individuals). Estimates of the percent of adults who identified as LGB or LGBT varied across surveys from between 2.2% and 4.0%, implying that between 5.2 million and 9.5 million individuals aged 18 and older are LGBT. Despite this variation in prevalence estimates, the analyzed surveys show many demographic similarities among respondents who choose to identify as LGB or LGBT. LGBT identity was more common among younger populations. LGBT populations generally shared the racial and ethnic characteristics of non-LGBT individuals. Adults were more likely to identify as LGBT in the Northeast and West than in the South and Midwest.

Transgender Military Service in the United States

June 23, 2014 Comments off

Transgender Military Service in the United States
Source: Williams Institute

An estimated 150,000 transgender individuals have served in the U.S. armed forces, or are currently on active duty. In addition, an estimated 134,000 transgender individuals are veterans or are retired from Guard or Reserve service, 8,800 transgender adults are currently on active duty in the U.S. armed forces, and an estimated 6,700 transgender individuals are serving in the Guard or Reserve forces. Transgender individuals assigned female at birth are nearly three times more likely than all adult women, and those assigned male at birth are 1.6 times more likely than all adult men, to serve.

Preschool selection considerations and experiences of school mistreatment among lesbian, gay, and heterosexual adoptive parents

March 23, 2014 Comments off

Preschool selection considerations and experiences of school mistreatment among lesbian, gay, and heterosexual adoptive parents
Source: The Williams Institute (UCLA)

Lesbian, Gay, or Bisexual parents of preschoolers may be particularly sensitive to family, racial and sexual diversity issues as they evaluate and select preschools for their children. Additionally, heterosexual adoptive parent families may be especially sensitive to adoption-related stigma and exclusion. Early childhood educators should recognize the growing diversity of contemporary families and consider adoption, family structure, and race as important components of curriculum development. Preschool-age children are beginning to develop an understanding of basic concepts such as race, ethnicity, gender, and families, yet their educators are often uncertain about how to enact more inclusive and affirming approaches to LGB families. Educators and administrators may require additional professional training to increase their knowledge and awareness of LGB and adoptive-parent families for the benefit of their overall approach to teaching.

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