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How frequently do private businesses pay workers?

July 9, 2014 Comments off

How frequently do private businesses pay workers?
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Payday is a highly anticipated day for any worker no matter when it takes place. How frequently workers get paid and how many paydays there are per year could affect their decisions as consumers, such as if and when they decide to purchase particular goods and services. If so, then the length of the workers’ pay period may have an impact on the velocity of money—that is, the number of times $1 is spent to purchase goods and services. Also, how frequently a worker is paid could play into his or her borrowing and saving choices.

From the employer perspective, the length of a business’ pay period is associated with the business’ costs and cash flows. Processing payroll, mailing checks, and paying the banking fees charged for a direct deposit are all costs that may incline businesses to pay their workers less frequently. However, most states set a minimum limit on how frequently employees are paid.

This Beyond the Numbers article analyzes pay frequencies, or lengths of pay periods, that private businesses use in the United States, as collected by the Current Employment Statistics (CES) survey. Data of this nature are not published in any standard Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS, the Bureau) source, but are available upon request. The article also explains why the CES program collects such data.

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The Employment Situation — June 2014

July 3, 2014 Comments off

The Employment Situation — June 2014
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 288,000 in June, and the unemployment rate declined to 6.1 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Job gains were widespread, led by employment growth in professional and business services, retail trade, food services and drinking places, and health care.

American Time Use Survey — 2013 Results

June 24, 2014 Comments off

American Time Use Survey — 2013 Results
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

On an average day in 2013, employed adults living in households with no children under age 18 engaged in leisure activities for 4.5 hours, about an hour more than employed adults living with a child under age 6, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Nearly everyone age 15 and over (95 percent) engaged in some sort of leisure activity, such as watching TV, socializing, or exercising.

Labor Force Characteristics of Foreign-born Workers — 2013

June 11, 2014 Comments off

Labor Force Characteristics of Foreign-born Workers — 2013
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

The unemployment rate for the foreign born in the United States was 6.9 percent in 2013, down from 8.1 percent in 2012, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. The jobless rate for the native born fell to 7.5 percent in 2013, also down from 8.1 percent in the prior year.

The Employment Situation — May 2014

June 6, 2014 Comments off

The Employment Situation — May 2014
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 217,000 in May, and the unemployment rate was unchanged at 6.3 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Employment increased in professional and business services, health care and social assistance, food services and drinking places, and transportation and warehousing.

Women in the Labor Force: A Databook

May 28, 2014 Comments off

Women in the Labor Force: A Databook (PDF)
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

This report presents historical and current labor force and earnings data for women from the Current Population Survey.

Formative Evaluation of Job Clubs Operated by Faith- and Community-Based Organizations: Findings From Site Visits and Options for Future Evaluation

May 27, 2014 Comments off

Formative Evaluation of Job Clubs Operated by Faith- and Community-Based Organizations: Findings From Site Visits and Options for Future Evaluation (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of Labor
From DOL email newsletter:

A new report documenting the activities of job search support groups, commonly referred to as “job clubs” operated by faith-based and community-based organizations has been published by the department’s Chief Evaluation Office. The report was unveiled on May 9 at the Crossroads Career Network national job clubs conference at Roswell United Methodist Church outside Atlanta. Secretary Perez offered opening remarks via video highlighting the role job clubs have played in serving middle-aged and older, long-term unemployed workers. Ben Seigel, senior policy advisor with the Employment and Training Administration, facilitated a live webcast with the report’s authors. The session also included a panel discussion with Georgia state and local workforce officials moderated by ETA Regional Administrator Les Range. It looked at ways that job clubs can help enhance employability and provide ongoing support to unemployed and under-employed individuals as they search for jobs.

Americans’ aging autos

May 13, 2014 Comments off

Americans’ aging autos
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

From 2008 to 2012, the average age of U.S. households’ vehicles increased as owners held on to their cars, trucks, and vans longer. The trend in aging autos coincides with declines in average household income in 2008; however, subsequent recovery in households’ incomes and a return to previous levels of expenditures on vehicles in 2012 do not appear to have reversed the pattern of aging. (See chart 1.) Analysis of data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer Expenditure Survey suggests that households continued to own the same number of vehicles over the last 10 years, but are owning their vehicles longer.

An overview of employment and wages in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) groups

May 12, 2014 Comments off

An overview of employment and wages in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) groups
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Total May 2013 OES employment in all STEM occupations is 16,994,480. This is nearly 13 percent of total national employment (132,588,810). Across the four types of STEM subdomains, health occupations have the most employment (8,276,100) and architecture occupations have the least employment (156,650). Of the five types of STEM occupations, the largest by far is group A (Research, development, design, or practitioner occupations), with employment of 9,874,110. Next largest is group B (Technologist and technician occupations), with employment of 5,212,070. The remaining three types of STEM occupations each have employment totals less than 1 million. Now, let’s take a look at employment estimates for each of the 20 groups.

Fact Sheet — Fatal and Nonfatal Occupational Injuries and Illnesses in the Oil and Gas Industry

May 5, 2014 Comments off

Fatal and Nonfatal Occupational Injuries and Illnesses in the Oil and Gas Industry
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

The private mining industry accounted for 155 fatal occupational injuries in 2011. The oil and gas extraction industries accounted for over 70 percent of those fatalities.

From 2003 to 2011, the latest year for which final numbers are available, the number of fatal occupational injuries in the private oil and gas industries ranged from as high as 125 in 2006 to as low as 68 in 2009. There were 112 fatal injuries in the oil and gas industry in 2011. Over the 5-year period from 2007 to 2011, there were 529 fatal injuries in the oil and gas industries. Texas recorded the highest number of fatalities, followed by Oklahoma and Louisiana. The table below provides a list of the 10 states with the highest number of oil and gas fatalities from 2007 to 2011. State industry counts should not be compared because of the large differences in employment and industry composition from state to state. Trends in the oil and gas extraction industries have been changing, with New Mexico and North Dakota seeing a larger increase than in years past.

Savings Fitness: A Guide to Your Money and Your Financial Future

May 5, 2014 Comments off

Savings Fitness: A Guide to Your Money and Your Financial Future
Source: U.S. Department of Labor

Most of us know it is smart to save money for those big-ticket items we really want to buy – a new television or car or home. Yet you may not realize that probably the most expensive thing you will ever buy in your lifetime is your retirement.

Perhaps you’ve never thought of “buying” your retirement. Yet that is exactly what you do when you put money into a retirement nest egg. You are paying today for the cost of your retirement tomorrow.

The cost of those future years is getting more expensive for most Americans, for two reasons. First, we live longer after we retire – with many of us spending 15, 25, even 30 years in retirement – and we are more active.

Second, you may have to shoulder a greater chunk of the cost of your retirement because fewer companies are providing traditional retirement plans. Many retirement plans today, such as the popular 401(k), are paid for primarily by the employee, not the employer. You may not have a retirement plan available at work or you may be self-employed. This puts the responsibility of choosing retirement investments squarely on your shoulders.

Unfortunately, just about 54 percent of all workers are earning retirement benefits at work, and many are not familiar with the basics of investing. Many people mistakenly believe that Social Security will pay for all or most of their retirement needs. The fact is, since its inception, Social Security has provided a minimum foundation of protection. A comfortable retirement usually requires Social Security, employer-based retirement plan benefits, personal savings, and investments.

In short, paying for the retirement you truly desire is ultimately your responsibility. You must take charge. You are the architect of your financial future.
That may sound like an impossible task. Many of us live paycheck to paycheck, barely making ends meet. You may have more pressing financial needs and goals than “buying” something so far in the future. Or perhaps you’ve waited until close to retirement before starting to save. Yet you still may be able to afford to buy the kind of retirement you want. Whether you are 18 or 58, you can take steps toward a better, more secure future.
That’s what this booklet is all about.

Payroll employment rises 288,000 in April; unemployment rate falls to 6.3%

May 2, 2014 Comments off

Payroll employment rises 288,000 in April; unemployment rate falls to 6.3%
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 288,000, and the unemployment rate fell by 0.4 percentage point to 6.3 percent in April, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Employment gains were widespread, led by job growth in professional and business services, retail trade, food services and drinking places, and construction.

Employment Characteristics of Families — 2013

April 30, 2014 Comments off

Employment Characteristics of Families — 2013
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

In 2013, 9.6 percent of families included an unemployed person, down from 10.5 percent in 2012, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Of the nation’s 80.4 million families, 80.0 percent had at least one employed member in 2013.

Monthly Labor Review — The first hundred years of the Consumer Price Index: a methodological and political history

April 25, 2014 Comments off

Monthly Labor Review — The first hundred years of the Consumer Price Index: a methodological and political history
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

From businesses to government agencies to senior citizens, groups with often competing aims and desires use the Consumer Price Index. In attempting to satisfy their disparate needs, the Bureau of Labor Statistics frequently is challenged to produce a statistic that is both timely and accurate. This technical and political history explains both how and why the Bureau has come to produce a family of Consumer Price Indexes to address the challenge.

Beyond the Numbers: Employer-sponsored benefits extended to domestic partners

April 24, 2014 Comments off

Beyond the Numbers: Employer-sponsored benefits extended to domestic partners
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

As part of compensation packages offered to employees, it is common for employers to extend certain benefits to an employee’s family members. For example, employment-based health benefits typically include insurance coverage for the family, and traditional (defined-benefit) pension plans provide survivor benefits to spouses of married employees. As employers recognize different family structures, many have adapted by offering similar benefits to employees who have varied family units. For example, employers often vary employee contributions for health benefits based on family makeup by identifying different contribution amounts for married employees with children and for single employees with children. New data provide a picture of how frequently certain benefits are extended to unmarried opposite-sex and unmarried same-sex partners. For example, 72 percent of civilian workers had access to employment-based health benefits in March 2013, with nearly all the employers extending these benefits to spouses and children, but only 32 percent of civilian workers had health benefits extended to unmarried same-sex domestic partners and 26 percent had benefits extended to unmarried opposite-sex domestic partners.

College Enrollment and Work Activity of 2013 High School Graduates

April 23, 2014 Comments off

College Enrollment and Work Activity of 2013 High School Graduates
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

In October 2013, 65.9 percent of 2013 high school graduates were enrolled in colleges or universities, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Recent high school graduates not enrolled in college in October 2013 were over twice as likely as enrolled graduates to be working or looking for work–74.2 percent compared with 34.1 percent.

Employment Services and Supports Available to Veterans with Disabilities Through the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Other Federal Agencies

April 19, 2014 Comments off

Employment Services and Supports Available to Veterans with Disabilities Through the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Other Federal Agencies (PDF)
Source: Mathematica Center for Studying Disability Policy

The number of military personnel incurring disability in current military conflicts is the highest in over three decades. Since 2001, over 1.6 million service members, Reservists, and National Guard have been deployed to Iraq, Afghanistan, and other Middle Eastern nations. As noted by Lew et al. (2007), advances in medical innovations and body armor have enabled 90 percent of soldiers to survive injuries that would have likely been fatal in previous wars, but many service personnel survive with serious physical and psychological injuries.

The Federal government has recently responded to the growing number of service members with disabilities in several ways. President Obama has signed executive orders to improve federal government hiring of veterans and to require federal agencies to contract with veteran owned agencies. The 2011 American Jobs Act added tax credits to employers hiring veterans with service co nnected disabilities. That same year, the Veterans Opportunity to Work (VOW) to Hire Heroes Act was passed and signed into law . The VOW Act provides additional tax credit and training funds for unemployed veterans to prepare them for employment.

Many federal agencies will be involved in the implementation of these initiatives. Employment services and supports for veterans with disabilities is primarily provided by the VA, but the Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Labor (DoL) also operate program s specifically targeting veterans with disabilities. Veterans also access other employment service programs that target all individuals with disabilities or persons in need specialized support to obtain employment.

T his report provides an overview of Federally – funded employment services and supports that can be accessed by veterans with disabilities, including those designed to meet the needs of the disabled veteran population specifically, the veteran population in general, and the disability population in general. The purpose is to present a comprehensive cataloging and review of all employment resources of which veterans with disabilities could access in pursuit of wage and self – employment.

DOL A to Z — Learn About the Labor Department

April 16, 2014 Comments off

DOL A to Z — Learn About the Labor Department
Source: U.S. Department of Labor

Learn about the Labor Department, break through the jargon and the acronyms and explore our work. To learn more about words and phrase not listed below you can visit the A to Z Index.

Occupational Outlook Quarterly — Spring 2014

April 14, 2014 Comments off

Occupational Outlook Quarterly — Spring 2014
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics
Articles include:

  • STEM 101: Intro to tomorrow’s jobs
  • Careers with options: Occupations with jobs in many industries
  • Healthcare: Millions of jobs now and in the future
  • My career: Veterinary technician
  • Brief items of interest to counselors and students
  • You’re a what? Roastmaster
  • More education, less unemployment

Occupational Employment and Wages — May 2013 (released 4/1/14)

April 9, 2014 Comments off

Occupational Employment and Wages — May 2013
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Retail salespersons and cashiers were the occupations with the largest employment in May 2013, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. These two occupations combined made up nearly 6 percent of total U.S. employment, with employment levels of 4.5 million and 3.3 million, respectively. National employment and wage information for all occupations is shown in table 1.

The data in this release are from the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) program, which provides employment and wage estimates by area and by industry for wage and salary workers in 22 major occupational groups, 94 minor occupational groups, 458 broad occupations, and 821 detailed occupations.

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