Archive

Archive for the ‘U.S. Department of Labor’ Category

Major Work Stoppages in 2014

April 24, 2015 Comments off

Major Work Stoppages in 2014
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

In 2014, there were 11 major work stoppages involving 1,000 or more workers and lasting at least one shift, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. The 11 major work stoppages beginning in 2014 were down from the 15 major work stoppages beginning in 2013, and equaled the second lowest annual total (11 in 2010) of work stoppages since the series began in 1947. The lowest annual total was 5 in 2009. (See chart 1 and table 1.)

Major work stoppages beginning in 2014 idled 34,000 workers, lower than the 2013 total of 55,000 idled workers. In 2014, there were 200,000 days idle from major work stoppages in effect, also lower than 2013 with 290,000 days idle. In 2014, private industry organizations accounted for 9 of the 11 major work stoppages in 2014. In addition, 7 of the 11 major work stoppages beginning in 2014 occurred in the health care and social assistance industry and the educational services industry. (See table 2.)

In 2014, the largest major work stoppage in both days idle and duration was between FairPoint Communications and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Locals 2320, 2326, and 2327 and the Communications Workers of America Local 1400, with 1,700 workers accounting for 86,700 days idle in 2014. The work stoppage was still ongoing at the end of 2014. (See table 2.)

Injuries and illness among state and local government bus drivers

April 12, 2015 Comments off

Injuries and illness among state and local government bus drivers
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

According to the American Public Transportation Association, people in the United States took 10.7 billion trips on public transportation in 2013. Just over half those trips were on motor buses. An estimated 5,780 state and local government transit and intercity bus drivers suffered injuries on the job in 2013. These injuries required at least one day away from work.

Bus drivers spend almost all of their worktime on the road. Transportation incidents were the most common event that lead to a workplace injury or illness among state and local bus drivers in 2011 and 2013. These incidents accounted for 42 percent of injuries and illnesses in 2013 and 36 percent in 2011. In 2012, transportation incidents accounted for 26 percent of cases that caused bus drivers to miss work, the second most common event that year.

Careers for music lovers

April 8, 2015 Comments off

Careers for music lovers
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Rock ’n’ roll. Jazz. Calypso. There are many different types of music, each with its own style. And just as musical styles vary, so, too, do occupations in the music world.

Musician and singer are popular choices for a musical career. But even if you can’t carry a tune, you can incorporate music into your work. Dancers, composers, and sound engineering technicians, for example, all work with music in various ways.

And for many, making music a career is a lifelong dream. “I started playing the piano at age 6 and fell in love instantly,” says Ciara McAllister, a pianist and music teacher in San Francisco, California. “I feel lucky to be able to make a living in music, my biggest passion.”

This article provides an overview of different types of careers for music lovers. The first section profiles several occupations that involve music. The second section describes how you can prepare for a music-related career. The third section details some of the high and low notes of working in music. Career resources are presented at the end.

Multiple jobholding over the past two decades

April 7, 2015 Comments off

Multiple jobholding over the past two decades
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

In 2013, 6.8 million workers in the United States held more than one job. Twenty years before, the figure was 7.5 million, although the total number of workers with a job was lower by 15.9 million. The multiple-jobholding rate—the proportion of multiple jobholders among all employed workers—rose from 6.2 percent in 1994 to a high of 6.8 percent during the summer of 1995. It has declined steadily since then and was at 5.0 percent by the end of 2013. Inspection of data from the Current Population Survey (CPS, see accompanying box) reveals that the downward trend holds across various sociodemographic groups of the working-age population (those 16 to 64 years old).

Beyond the Numbers — Movies, music, and sports: U.S. entertainment spending, 2008–2013

April 3, 2015 Comments off

Beyond the Numbers — Movies, music, and sports: U.S. entertainment spending, 2008–2013
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Entertainment has long been a household budget staple. Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE) data from 1934–1936 show that, even during the Great Depression, spending on entertainment accounted for 5.4 percent of the household budget. In 2008, during the last recession, entertainment spending had reached an average of $2,835 per year or 5.6 percent of total household expenditures. The last recession officially ended in June 2009, and by 2013, income and spending had recovered. However, entertainment spending never returned to prerecession highs; in 2013, the average was $2,482 or 4.9 percent of total household spending.

This Beyond the Numbers article examines entertainment spending from 2008 to 2013 and breaks the spending down into its four parts: fees and admissions; audio and visual equipment and services; pets, toys, hobbies, and playground equipment; and other entertainment supplies, equipment, and services. This article also analyzes the relationships between entertainment spending and 1) income, 2) education, and 3) age.

The Employment Situation — March 2015

April 3, 2015 Comments off

The Employment Situation — March 2015
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 126,000 in March, and the unemployment rate was unchanged at 5.5 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Employment continued to trend up in professional and business services, health care, and retail trade, while mining lost jobs.

Number of Jobs Held, Labor Market Activity, and Earnings Growth Among the Youngest Baby Boomers: Results from a Longitudinal Survey Summary

April 2, 2015 Comments off

Number of Jobs Held, Labor Market Activity, and Earnings Growth Among the Youngest Baby Boomers: Results from a Longitudinal Survey Summary
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

The average person born in the latter years of the baby boom (1957-1964) held 11.7 jobs from age 18 to age 48, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Nearly half of these jobs were held from ages 18 to 24.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,033 other followers