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Occupational Outlook Quarterly — Spring 2014

April 14, 2014 Comments off

Occupational Outlook Quarterly — Spring 2014
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics
Articles include:

  • STEM 101: Intro to tomorrow’s jobs
  • Careers with options: Occupations with jobs in many industries
  • Healthcare: Millions of jobs now and in the future
  • My career: Veterinary technician
  • Brief items of interest to counselors and students
  • You’re a what? Roastmaster
  • More education, less unemployment
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Occupational Employment and Wages — May 2013 (released 4/1/14)

April 9, 2014 Comments off

Occupational Employment and Wages — May 2013
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Retail salespersons and cashiers were the occupations with the largest employment in May 2013, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. These two occupations combined made up nearly 6 percent of total U.S. employment, with employment levels of 4.5 million and 3.3 million, respectively. National employment and wage information for all occupations is shown in table 1.

The data in this release are from the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) program, which provides employment and wage estimates by area and by industry for wage and salary workers in 22 major occupational groups, 94 minor occupational groups, 458 broad occupations, and 821 detailed occupations.

The Employment Situation — March 2014

April 4, 2014 Comments off

The Employment Situation — March 2014
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 192,000 in March, and the unemployment rate was unchanged at 6.7 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Employment grew in professional and business services, in health care, and in mining and logging.

Nonfatal injuries and illnesses among state and local government workers

April 3, 2014 Comments off

Nonfatal injuries and illnesses among state and local government workers
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

The scope of the Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses was expanded with the 2008 survey to cover a more complete section of the U.S. economy: state and local government workers. Prior to the publication of the 2008 survey results, data users commonly requested information about industries in the public sector. Estimates covering nearly 18.5 million state and local government workers show that these public sector employees experienced a higher incidence rate of work-related injuries and illnesses than their private industry counterparts.This Spotlight on Statistics compares characteristics of injury and illness cases in state and local government with those in private industry, highlighting incidence rate trends in selected state and local government industries and examining injury and illness rates and cases that occurred in state and local government workplaces in 2011.

Employer-sponsored benefits extended to domestic partners

April 2, 2014 Comments off

Employer-sponsored benefits extended to domestic partners
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

As part of compensation packages offered to employees, it is common for employers to extend certain benefits to an employee’s family members. For example, employment-based health benefits typically include insurance coverage for the family, and traditional (defined-benefit) pension plans provide survivor benefits to spouses of married employees. As employers recognize different family structures, many have adapted by offering similar benefits to employees who have varied family units. For example, employers often vary employee contributions for health benefits based on family makeup by identifying different contribution amounts for married employees with children and for single employees with children. New data provide a picture of how frequently certain benefits are extended to unmarried opposite-sex and unmarried same-sex partners. For example, 72 percent of civilian workers had access to employment-based health benefits in March 2013, with nearly all the employers extending these benefits to spouses and children, but only 32 percent of civilian workers had health benefits extended to unmarried same-sex domestic partners and 26 percent had benefits extended to unmarried opposite-sex domestic partners.

America’s Young Adults at 27: Labor Market Activity, Education, and Household Composition: Results From a Longitudinal Survey Summary

April 1, 2014 Comments off

America’s Young Adults at 27: Labor Market Activity, Education, and Household Composition: Results From a Longitudinal Survey Summary
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

\Young adults born in the early 1980s held an average of 6.2 jobs from age 18 through age 26, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Over two-thirds of these jobs were held from ages 18 to 22. Women with more education held more jobs than women with less education. Regardless of education, men held a similar number of jobs.

Productivity and Costs by Industry: Manufacturing Industries, 2012

March 28, 2014 Comments off

Productivity and Costs by Industry: Manufacturing Industries, 2012
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Labor productivity — defined as output per hour — rose in 54 percent of the detailed manufacturing industries covered in 2012, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. This was down from 68 percent in 2011. Unit labor costs, which reflect the total labor costs required to produce a unit of output, declined in 39 percent of the industries in 2012 compared to 49 percent in 2011. More than half of industries with productivity increases posted declines in unit labor costs.

Output and hours rose in more industries in 2012 than in the previous year. (See table 1.) Output rose in 2012 in 40 of 57 NAICS 4-digit manufacturing industries for which data were available, up from 37 industries in 2011. Hours increased in even more industries, 41 compared to 32 in 2011. Hours rose in more industries in 2012 than in any year since 1997.

Measuring occupational concentration by industry

March 26, 2014 Comments off

Measuring occupational concentration by industry
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Although some occupations are found in nearly every industry in the United States, others are specific to one or only a few industries. For example, several of the most concentrated occupations in the coal mining industry are found primarily in that industry, and are uncommon outside of the mining and extraction sector. As a result, job mobility for these workers might be extremely limited in the face of an industry downturn, particularly one affecting the extraction industries in general. On the other hand, although over a quarter of computer systems analysts are found in the computer systems design and related services industry, this occupation was distributed relatively evenly across sectors, potentially allowing displaced workers to move more easily into other industries. Understanding the relationship between industry and occupation may provide important insights into workers’ ability to cope with job loss by moving across industries.

A cohort component analysis of the 2007–2009 recession

March 21, 2014 Comments off

A cohort component analysis of the 2007–2009 recession
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

A model of employment change between 2007 and 2010 in the absence of the recession was compared with actual employment change as measured by the Current Population Survey. Not surprisingly, results show that actual employment was lower than the model predicted for all age groups; however, differences were much larger for younger workers. Full-time employment was much lower than the model predicted, while part-time employment was much higher. Actual employment change varied widely among occupation and industry groups, but nearly all groups had employment that was lower than the model predicted.

Employment Situation of Veterans – 2013

March 20, 2014 Comments off

Employment Situation of Veterans – 2013
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

The unemployment rate for veterans who served on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces at any time since September 2001–a group referred to as Gulf War-era II veterans–edged down to 9.0 percent in 2013, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. The jobless rate for all veterans also edged down to 6.6 percent. Twenty-nine percent of Gulf War-era II veterans reported having a service-connected disability in August 2013, compared with 15 percent of all veterans.

New From the GAO

March 19, 2014 Comments off

New GAO Report
Source: Government Accountability Office

Whistleblower Protection Program: Opportunities Exist for OSHA and DOT to Strengthen Collaborative Mechanisms. GAO-14-286, March 19.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-286
Highlights - http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/661769.pdf

U.S. Department of Labor Strategic Plan — Fiscal Years 2014-2018

March 18, 2014 Comments off

U.S. Department of Labor Strategic Plan — Fiscal Years 2014-2018 (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of Labor

Putting Americans back to work in well-paying positions is job number one, but we also must do more to promote opportunity to grow the American economy for the benefit of all our citizens. America prospers when we’re all in it together; when hard work pays off and responsibility is rewarded; when everyone, from Main Street to Wall Street, does their fair share, plays by the same rules, and enjoys the same opportunity to succeed.

The Administration is building an economy of opportunity, where all Americans who work hard and act responsibly have the opportunity to reach and remain in the middle class. Under Secretary Tom Perez, the Labor Department will play a critical role in that effort.

The Department of Labor is the Department of Opportunity. From job training that provides American workers with the skills they need to succeed in 21st century jobs, to our efforts to protect the health, safety, and earnings of American workers and retirees, the Department of Labor protects and promotes the very opportunity on which America is built; this Strategic Plan details that work.

The Employment Situation — February 2014

March 7, 2014 Comments off

The Employment Situation — February 2014
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 175,000 in February, and the unemployment rate was little changed at 6.7 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Employment increased in professional and business services and in wholesale trade but declined in information.

Volunteering in the United States 2013

February 25, 2014 Comments off

Volunteering in the United States 2013
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

The volunteer rate declined by 1.1 percentage points to 25.4 percent for the year ending in September 2013, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. About 62.6 million people volunteered through or for an organization at least once between September 2012 and September 2013. The volunteer rate in 2013 was the lowest it has been since the supplement was first administered in 2002.

Major Work Stoppages in 2013

February 20, 2014 Comments off

Major Work Stoppages in 2013
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

In 2013, there were 15 major strikes and lockouts involving 1,000 or more workers and lasting at least one shift, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. The 15 major work stoppages beginning in 2013 were down from 19 major work stoppages beginning in 2012. (See chart 1 and table 1.)

Major work stoppages beginning in 2013 idled 55,000 workers, lower than 2012 with 148,000 idled workers. In 2013, there were 290,000 days idle from major work stoppages in effect, also lower than 2012 with 1.13 million days idle. In 2013, two-thirds of major work stoppages lasted three or less workdays. State and local government accounted for 60 percent of major work stoppages beginning in 2013. In addition, over half of major work stoppages beginning in 2013 occurred in the state of California. (See chart 2, and tables 1 and 2.)

The longest and most days idle of any major work stoppage beginning in 2013 was between the New York City Public Schools and the Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1181, with 8,000 workers accounting for 176,000 days idle. The greatest number of workers involved in a major work stoppage beginning in 2013 was between the University of California Medical Centers and American Federation of State County and Municipal Employees Local 3299 (including the University Professional and Technical Employees Union for one day), involving as many as 18,800 workers. (See table 2.)

Other notable work stoppages beginning in 2013 included the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) and the Service Employees International Union Local 1021 and the Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1555. BART was involved in two major work stoppages, occurring in July and October. (See table 2.)

Fatal occupational injuries involving contractors, 2011

February 14, 2014 Comments off

Fatal occupational injuries involving contractors, 2011
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Before 2011, the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries captured data only on the firm that directly employed the decedent. While this is useful information, the firm directly employing the decedent is not always the firm at which the decedent was working at the time of the incident, such as when the person killed was a contractor. This visual essay looks at new data on contractors, highlighting some interesting similarities and differences between these workers and those who are not contractors.

Throwback — Report of the President’s Commission on the Status of Women (1963)

February 12, 2014 Comments off

Report of the President’s Commission on the Status of Women (1963) (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of Women

In presenting to you the report of your Commission on the Status of women, we are mindful first of all that we transmit it bereft of our Chairman. Today is Eleanor Roosevelt’s birthday. In handing you the results of the work started with her active participation, we wish once again to pay tribute to a great woman. Her devotion to fuller realization of the abilities of women in all walks of life and in all countries raised the status of women everywhere in the world.

Accepting your invitation to do so, we have assessed the position of women and the functions they perform in the home, in the economy, in the society. In so vast a field, selection of points of concentration was unavoidable. In any case, certain priorities were estalbished for us by your Executive order that brought the commission into being.

Trends in metal prices for Olympic medals

February 10, 2014 Comments off

Trends in metal prices for Olympic medals
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

The Employment Situation — January 2014

February 7, 2014 Comments off

The Employment Situation — January 2014
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 113,000 in January, and the unemployment rate was little changed at 6.6 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Employment grew in construction, manufacturing, wholesale trade, and mining.

Job promotion in midcareer: gender, recession, and “crowding”

February 3, 2014 Comments off

Job promotion in midcareer: gender, recession, and “crowding”
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 indicate that, between 1996 and 2010, women, on average, lost some of the promotion momentum they had achieved at the beginning of midcareer, although they outperformed men in this regard. For both genders, the economic downturn of 2001 and the Great Recession of 2007–2009 contributed to reduced promotion probabilities. In the case of women, however, cohort effects, rather than the business cycle, seem to explain the promotion experience during the Great Recession. Promotions translate into higher real-wage increases, especially when coupled with growth in job responsibilities. Crowding effects, if not necessarily a thing of the past, are no longer manifested in reduced female promotion rates or earnings.

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