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Reducing Poverty in the United States: Results of a Microsimulation Analysis of the Community Advocates Public Policy Institute Policy Package

March 30, 2015 Comments off

Reducing Poverty in the United States: Results of a Microsimulation Analysis of the Community Advocates Public Policy Institute Policy Package
Source: Urban Institute

A package of five policies—a transitional jobs (TJ) program, a $10.10 minimum wage, expanded earned income tax credits, a tax credit for senior citizens and people with disabilities, and expanded child care subsidies—could cut the national poverty rate by at least half. Using the TRIM3 microsimulation model and the Supplemental Poverty measure, the analysis shows the national poverty rate falling fall from 14.8 percent to either 7.4 percent or 6.3 percent, depending on the take-up rate assumed for the TJ program. Poverty is greatly reduced for all age groups and race/ethnicity groups.

The growing distance between people and jobs in metropolitan America

March 26, 2015 Comments off

The growing distance between people and jobs in metropolitan America
Source: Brookings Institution

Proximity to employment can influence a range of economic and social outcomes, from local fiscal health to the employment prospects of residents, particularly low-income and minority workers. An analysis of private-sector employment and demographic data at the census tract level reveals that:

Between 2000 and 2012, the number of jobs within the typical commute distance for residents in a major metro area fell by 7 percent.

As employment suburbanized, the number of jobs near both the typical city and suburban resident fell.

As poor and minority residents shifted toward suburbs in the 2000s, their proximity to jobs fell more than for non-poor and white residents.

Residents of high-poverty and majority-minority neighborhoods experienced particularly pronounced declines in job proximity.

Keeping Score When It Counts: Graduation Success and Academic Progress Rates for the 2015 NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament Teams

March 23, 2015 Comments off

Keeping Score When It Counts: Graduation Success and Academic Progress Rates for the 2015 NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament Teams (PDF)
Source: Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (University of Central Florida College of Business Administration)

The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida (UCF) released its annual study, “Keeping Score When It Counts: Graduation Success and Academic Progress Rates for the 2015 NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament Teams.” This study provides the most comprehensive analysis of the academic performance of student-athletes on teams participating in the 2015 NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament.

The study examined the Graduation Success Rates (GSR) and Academic Progress Rates (APR) for tournament teams as reported by the NCAA. This study also compared the graduation rate data of white and African-American male basketball student-athletes.

“There is good news to report as almost every category examined got better. The GSR numbers for white male basketball student-athletes increased from 89 percent in 2014 to 93 percent in 2015. The GSR for African-American male basketball student-athletes increased from 65 in 2014 to 69 percent in 2015.

However, the enormous gap between the graduation rates of white and African-American student-athletes in 2015 remained the same as 2014 at a terrible 24 percent.

See also: Keeping Score When It Counts: Academic Progress/Graduation Success Rate Study of 2015 NCAA Division I Men’s and Women’s Basketball Tournament Teams (PDF)

Achievement Gap Narrows as High School Graduation Rates for Minority Students Improve Faster than Rest of Nation

March 19, 2015 Comments off

Achievement Gap Narrows as High School Graduation Rates for Minority Students Improve Faster than Rest of Nation
Source: U.S. Department of Education

Graduation rates for black and Hispanic students increased by nearly 4 percentage points from 2011 to 2013, outpacing the growth for all students in the nation, according to new data from the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics.

What’s more, the gap between white students and black and Hispanic students receiving high school diplomas narrowed over that time, the data show.

The Labor Force in an Aging and Growing America; Mapping America’s Futures, Brief 4

March 17, 2015 Comments off

The Labor Force in an Aging and Growing America; Mapping America’s Futures, Brief 4
Source: Urban Institute

From 2010 to 2030, patterns of labor force participation will change across regions of the United States. In some regions, the primary demographic effect will be changes in age structure, which will drive declines in labor force participation rates. In other regions, in-migration and changes in the racial and ethnic composition of the adult population will primarily increase the numbers of the “dependent population”-people not in the labor force. Still other regions will have to accommodate both sharply declining participation rates and sharply increasing nonparticipants. These diverse patterns of changes in labor force participation pose different challenges to regions.

See also:
+ Evolving Patterns in Diversity Mapping America’s Futures, Brief 2
+ Children and Youth in an Aging America; Mapping America’s Futures, Brief 3

New Census Bureau Report Analyzes U.S. Population Projections

March 9, 2015 Comments off

New Census Bureau Report Analyzes U.S. Population Projections
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

A new U.S. Census Bureau report released today provides an in-depth analysis of the nation’s population looking forward to 2060, including its size and composition across age, sex, race, Hispanic origin and nativity. These projections are the first to incorporate separate projections of fertility for native- and foreign-born women, permitting the Census Bureau to better account for the effects of international migration on the U.S. population.

According to the report, Projections of the Size and Composition of the U.S. Population: 2014 to 2060:

  • The U.S. population is expected to grow more slowly in future decades than it did in the previous century. Nonetheless, the total population of 319 million in 2014 is projected to reach the 400 million threshold in 2051 and 417 million in 2060.
  • Around the time the 2020 Census is conducted, more than half of the nation’s children are expected to be part of a minority race or ethnic group. This proportion is expected to continue to grow so that by 2060, just 36 percent of all children (people under age 18) will be single-race non-Hispanic white, compared with 52 percent today.
  • The U.S. population as a whole is expected to follow a similar trend, becoming majority-minority in 2044. The minority population is projected to rise to 56 percent of the total in 2060, compared with 38 percent in 2014.
  • While one milestone would be reached by the 2020 Census, another will be achieved by the 2030 Census: all baby boomers will have reached age 65 or older (this will actually occur in 2029). Consequently, in that year, one-in-five Americans would be 65 or older, up from one in seven in 2014.
  • By 2060, the nation’s foreign-born population would reach nearly 19 percent of the total population, up from 13 percent in 2014.

Segregated City: The Geography of Economic Segregation in America’s Metros

March 9, 2015 Comments off

Segregated City: The Geography of Economic Segregation in America’s Metros
Source: Martin Prosperity Institute

Americans have become increasingly sorted over the past couple of decades by income, education, and class. A large body of research has focused on the dual migrations of more affluent and skilled people and the less advantaged across the United States. Increasingly, Americans are sorting not just between cities and metro areas, but within them as well.

This study examines the geography of economic segregation in America. While most previous studies of economic segregation have generally focused on income, this report examines three dimensions of economic segregation: by income, education, and occupation. It develops individual and combined measures of income, educational, and occupational segregation, as well as an Overall Economic Segregation Index, and maps them across the more than 70,000 Census tracts that make up America’s 350-plus metros. In addition, it examines the key economic, social, and demographic factors that are associated with them.

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