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Hunger by the numbers in the African-American community

February 25, 2015 Comments off

Hunger by the numbers in the African-American community (PDF)
Source: Bread for the World Institute

In the United States, over 42 million people identify as African-American or black—13.6 percent of the U.S. population. Last year, poverty and hunger declined for the first time since the start of the recession.

Last year’s decline in poverty and hunger mirrors the decrease in unemployment that also occurred. Bread for the World believes that the best pathway out of hunger and poverty is a good job. African-Americans continue to suffer from disproportionately higher unemployment rates than the general U.S. population as well as any other major group despite the economic gains of the past few years.

Diversity Explosion: The cultural generation gap mapped

February 23, 2015 Comments off

Diversity Explosion: The cultural generation gap mapped
Source: Brookings Institution

In the new book Diversity Explosion: How New Racial Demographics are Remaking America, William Frey highlights the “bottom up” demographic change that is occurring in the United States as today’s youth are considerably more racially diverse than previous predominantly white generations. As a result of this demographic structure, the nation faces a “cultural generation gap.” Yet these dynamics vary considerably from place to place. The following interactive feature illustrates this point by mapping the racial composition of different age groups at the county and metropolitan area scales.

The map defaults to showing the share of the total county population (all ages) that is white. Yet even among largely white counties a different pattern emerges when selecting younger age groups from the menu. Greater diversity can be seen among counties located in the nation’s Southeast, Southwest and coasts. By selecting a different race/ethnicity from the menu, maps highlighting different aspects of this diversity associated with blacks, Hispanics, Asians and persons with two or more races can be explored. Hovering over each county reveals a chart depicting the extent of the “cultural generation gap” in that county.

In addition, each of these indicators can be examined at the metropolitan level scale, by clicking on the “metropolitan area” button.

Racial/Ethnic Differences in Uninsurance Rates under the ACA

February 18, 2015 Comments off

Racial/Ethnic Differences in Uninsurance Rates under the ACA
Source: Urban Institute

This report is the first state-level projection of ACA coverage gains for racial/ethnic groups. Absent ACA coverage provisions, Latinos, blacks, and American Indian/Alaska Natives are overrepresented among the uninsured. With the ACA and current state Medicaid expansion decisions, uninsurance rates are projected to fall for each racial/ethnic group, narrowing coverage differences between whites and each minority group, except for blacks. If all states were to expand their Medicaid programs, we project that uninsurance rates would fall further for all racial/ethnic groups, with blacks experiencing a marked reduction. Effective outreach can further reduce uninsurance rates for all racial/ethnic groups.

EJI’s new lynching report documents an era of racial terrorism

February 12, 2015 Comments off

EJI’s new lynching report documents an era of racial terrorism
Source: Equal Justice Initiative

The Equal Justice Initiative (EJI) today released Lynching in America: Confronting the Legacy of Racial Terror, which documents EJI’s multi-year investigation into lynching in twelve Southern states during the period between Reconstruction and World War II. EJI researchers documented 3959 racial terror lynchings of African Americans in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia between 1877 and 1950 – at least 700 more lynchings of black people in these states than previously reported in the most comprehensive work done on lynching to date.

+ Report Summary (PDF) (Was unable to locate full report on website.)

Black Lives Matter: Eliminating Racial Inequity in the Criminal Justice System

February 4, 2015 Comments off

Black Lives Matter: Eliminating Racial Inequity in the Criminal Justice System (PDF)
Source: The Sentencing Project

A new publication from The Sentencing Project provides a comprehensive review of programs and policies across the nation and identifies a broad range of initiatives that can address racial disparities at all levels of the criminal justice system. Black Lives Matter: Eliminating Racial Inequity in the Criminal Justice System highlights initiatives in more than 20 states designed to address the criminal justice system’s high rate of contact with people of color.

In the wake of the tragedies in Ferguson and other cities, excessive police contact has been identified as a major cause of the disproportionate rate of fatal police encounters for African Americans and Latinos. The report identifies four key features of the criminal justice system that produce racially unequal outcomes, beyond the conditions of socioeconomic inequality that contribute to higher rates of some crimes in marginalized communities, and showcases initiatives to abate these sources of inequity in adult and juvenile justice systems around the country.

New Study Reveals “Double Jeopardy” Faced by Women of Color in STEM

January 28, 2015 Comments off

New Study Reveals “Double Jeopardy” Faced by Women of Color in STEM
Source: Hastings School of Law, University of California

A new study released today from the Center for WorkLife Law at UC Hastings combines in-depth interviews of 60 women of color in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) with a survey of 557 women in STEM (both women of color and White women), and finds pervasive gender bias.

Significant findings of the report include:

  1. 100% of the women interviewed reported gender bias.
  2. Black women are more likely (77%) than other women (66%) to report having to prove themselves over and over again.
  3. The stereotype that Asians are good at science appears to help Asian-American women with students—but not with colleagues.
  4. Asian-Americans reported both more pressure than other groups of women to adhere to traditionally feminine roles and more pushback if they don’t.
  5. Latinas who behave assertively risk being seen as “angry” or “too emotional,” even when they report they weren’t angry; they just weren’t deferential.
  6. Latinas report being pressured by colleagues to do admin support work for their male colleagues, such as organizing meetings and filling out forms.
  7. Both Latinas and Black women report regularly being mistaken as janitors.

The implication: women leave STEM in response to pervasive and persistent gender bias.

Facts for Features: Black (African-American) History Month: February 2015

January 26, 2015 Comments off

Facts for Features: Black (African-American) History Month: February 2015
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

To commemorate and celebrate the contributions to our nation made by people of African descent, American historian Carter G. Woodson established Black History Week. The first celebration occurred on Feb. 12, 1926. For many years, the second week of February was set aside for this celebration to coincide with the birthdays of abolitionist/editor Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. In 1976, as part of the nation’s bicentennial, the week was expanded into Black History Month. Each year, U.S. presidents proclaim February as National African-American History Month.

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