Archive

Archive for the ‘National Center for Victims of Crime’ Category

Taking Action: An Advocate’s Guide to Assisting Victims of Financial Fraud

February 18, 2014 Comments off

Taking Action: An Advocate’s Guide to Assisting Victims of Financial Fraud (PDF)
Source: Financial Industry Regulatory Authority/National Center for Victims of Crime

Financial fraud is real and can be devastating. Fortunately, in every community there are individuals in a position to provide tangible help to victims. To assist them, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) Investor Education Foundation and the National Center for Victims of Crime joined forces in 2013 to develop Taking Action: An Advocate’s Guide to Assisting Victims of Financial Fraud.

Prevention is an important part of combating financial fraud. We also know that financial fraud occurs in spite of preventive methods. When fraud occurs, victims are left to cope with the aftermath of compromised identities, damaged credit, and financial loss, and a painful range of emotions including anger, fear, and frustration.

This guide gives victim advocates a roadmap for how to respond in the wake of a financial crime, from determining the type of fraud to reporting it to the proper authorities. The guide also includes case management tools for advocates, starting with setting reasonable expectations of recovery and managing the emotional fallout of financial fraud.

Our hope is that this guide will empower victim advocates, law enforcement, regulators, and a wide range of community professionals to capably assist financial victims with rebuilding their lives.

Who’s Lending a Hand?: A National Survey of Nonprofit Volunteer Screening Practices

April 19, 2011 Comments off

Who’s Lending a Hand?: A National Survey of Nonprofit Volunteer Screening Practices (PDF)
Source: National Center for Victims of Crime

The National Center for Victims of Crime conducted a telephone survey of 517 nonprofit human service organizations to identify: characteristics of organizations that regularly screen volunteers, the screening methods used, and how information revealed by screening is used in decision making. Most organizations say they conduct some screening, but few conduct thorough screening using all available methods of gathering information, including reference and background checks. In fact, one in four organizations does not call references for potential volunteers, and 27 percent do not conduct any type of background check. Less than one-third use fingerprints, the most reliable form of criminal background check. Most organizations say they would not accept a volunteer with a criminal history or a report of child or elder abuse, but some that said they would disqualify on that basis are not checking the sources of that information. For most organizations and volunteers, credit history is not an issue.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 987 other followers