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Improving Emergency Response at Airports

July 17, 2015 Comments off

Improving Emergency Response at Airports
Source: Transportation Research Board

The April 2015 issue of TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Impacts on Practice highlights how airports like Grand Forks International Airport (GFK) in North Dakota have applied the findings from ACRP Report 95: Integrating Community Emergency Response Teams (A-CERTs) at Airports. Officials at GFK credit the direction provided in ACRP Report 95 with enabling the airport to build, implement, and maintain a successful response team.

Air Base Attacks and Defensive Counters: Historical Lessons and Future Challenges

July 16, 2015 Comments off

Air Base Attacks and Defensive Counters: Historical Lessons and Future Challenges
Source: RAND Corporation

Since the end of the Cold War, U.S. dominance in conventional power projection has allowed American airpower to operate from sanctuary, largely free from enemy attack. This led to a reduced emphasis on air-base defense measures and the misperception that sanctuary was the normal state of affairs rather than an aberration. The emergence of the long-range, highly accurate, conventional missile (both ballistic and cruise) as a threat to air bases is now widely recognized in the U.S. defense community, and, with that recognition, there is a growing appreciation that this era of sanctuary is coming to an end. Consequently, there is renewed interest in neglected topics, such as base hardening, aircraft dispersal, camouflage, deception, and air-base recovery and repair.

This report is intended to provide a reference on air-base attack and defense to inform public debate, as well as government deliberations, on what has become known as the anti-access problem, specifically as it applies to air-base operations. The report explores the history of air-base attacks in the past century and describes the American way of war that emerged after the fall of the Soviet Union. It then argues that emerging threat systems are disruptive to this way of war and will require new concepts of power projection. Finally, the report identifies five classes of defensive options that have proven valuable in past conflicts and offers recommendations on how best to win the battle of the airfields.

Sovereign Immunity for Public Airport Operations

July 15, 2015 Comments off

Sovereign Immunity for Public Airport Operations
Source: Transportation Research Board

TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Legal Research Digest 24: Sovereign Immunity for Public Airport Operations examines sovereign immunity as it applies to public airports that are owned and operated by units of local government or regional governmental authorities. This report summarizes the extent of sovereign immunity granted to airports from state to state. Appendix A provides a table of cases, and Appendix B contains a chart of authorities.

Guidebook for Airport Terminal Restroom Planning and Design

July 10, 2015 Comments off

Guidebook for Airport Terminal Restroom Planning and Design
Source: Transportation Research Board

TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Report 130: Guidebook for Airport Terminal Restroom Planning and Design explores a process to help airport practitioners plan, design, and implement terminal restroom projects.

The guidebook’s printed appendixes include a discussion of the restroom of the future. Appendixes A, C-H include case studies, focus group summaries, and a bibliography. Appendix B includes editable restroom evaluation forms. These appendixes are available online and on the CD-ROM accompanying the print version of the report.

A Review of the Next Generation Air Transportation System: Implications and Importance of System Architecture (2015)

July 7, 2015 Comments off

A Review of the Next Generation Air Transportation System: Implications and Importance of System Architecture (2015)
Source: National Research Council

The Next Generation Air Transportation System’s (NextGen) goal is the transformation of the U.S. national airspace system through programs and initiatives that could make it possible to shorten routes, navigate better around weather, save time and fuel, reduce delays, and improve capabilities for monitoring and managing of aircraft. A Review of the Next Generation Air Transportation provides an overview of NextGen and examines the technical activities, including human-system design and testing, organizational design, and other safety and human factor aspects of the system, that will be necessary to successfully transition current and planned modernization programs to the future system. This report assesses technical, cost, and schedule risk for the software development that will be necessary to achieve the expected benefits from a highly automated air traffic management system and the implications for ongoing modernization projects. The recommendations of this report will help the Federal Aviation Administration anticipate and respond to the challenges of implementing NextGen.

DHS OIG — TSA Can Improve Aviation Worker Vetting (Redacted)

June 9, 2015 Comments off

TSA Can Improve Aviation Worker Vetting (Redacted) (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of Inspector General

Why We Did This
We conducted this review to identify enhancements to the Transportation Security Administration’s (TSA) vetting of workers with access to secure areas of commercial airports for links to terrorism, criminal history, and lawful status. We also assessed the accuracy and reliability of data TSA uses for vetting.

Why We Did This
We conducted this review to identify enhancements to the Transportation Security Administration’s (TSA) vetting of workers with access to secure areas of commercial airports for links to terrorism, criminal history, and lawful status. We also assessed the accuracy and reliability of data TSA uses for vetting.

Open skies: Estimating travelers’ benefits from free trade in airline services

June 1, 2015 Comments off

Open skies: Estimating travelers’ benefits from free trade in airline services
Source: Brookings Institution

The United States has negotiated bilateral open skies agreements to deregulate airline competition on US international routes, but little is known about their effects on travelers’ welfare and the gains from the US negotiating agreements with more countries. We develop a model of international airline competition to estimate the effects of open skies agreements on fares and flight frequency. We find the agreements have generated at least $4 billion in annual gains to travelers and that travelers would gain an additional $4 billion if the US negotiated agreements with other countries that have a significant amount of international passenger traffic.

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