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Comparison of coffee, tea and green tea consumption between Japanese with and without metabolic syndrome in a cross-sectional study

June 1, 2012 Comments off
Source:  Open Journal of Epidemiology

There are some reports that coffee consumption improves insulin resistance. Therefore, we investigated the link between metabolic syndrome and coffee, tea and green tea consumption in Japanese. We used data of 150 men and 227 women who were not taking any medications, aged 22 – 74 years, in this cross-sectional investigation study. Habitual coffee, tea and green tea consumption was defined as drinking one or more cups of coffee, tea and green tea per day. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was based on the Japanese criteria. In subjects without medications, 34 men (22.7%) and 10 women (4.4%) were diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. Coffee and green tea consumption was weakly and positively correlated with age in women. Significant differences of coffee consumption between women with and without abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension, tea consumption between men with and without dyslipidemia were noted after adjusting for age. However, there were no significant differences of other consumption between subjects with and without metabolic syndrome in both sexes. Among Japanese not taking medications, coffee, tea and green tea consumption was not clearly associated with metabolic syndrome in the Japanese population.

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The Rise of Diabetes Prevalence in the Arab Region

May 31, 2012 Comments off
Source:  Open Journal of Epidemiology
Introduction:
Arab populations have many similarities and dissimilarities. They share culture, language and religion but they are also subject to economic, political and social differences. The purpose of this study is to understand the causes of the rising trend of diabetes prevalence in order to suggest efficient actions susceptible to reduce the burden of diabetes in the Arab world.
Method:
We use principal component analysis to illustrate similarities and differences between Arab countries according to four variables: 1) the prevalence of diabetes, 2) impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), 3) diabetes related deaths and 4) diabetes related expenditure per person. A linear regression is also used to study the correlation between human development index and diabetes prevalence.
Results:
Arab countries are mainly classified into three groups according to the diabetes comparative prevalence (high, medium and low) but other differences are seen in terms of diabetes-related mortality and diabetes related expenditure per person. We also investigate the correlation between the human development index (HDI) and diabetes comparative prevalence (R = 0.81).
Conclusion:
The alarming rising trend of diabetes prevalence in the Arab region constitutes a real challenge for heath decision makers. In order to alleviate the burden of diabetes, preventive strategies are needed, based essentially on sensitization for a more healthy diet with regular exercise but health authorities are also asked to provide populations with heath- care and early diagnosis to avoid the high burden caused by complications of diabetes.

The psychiatric profile of the U.S. patient population across age groups

May 30, 2012 Comments off
Source:  Open Journal of Epidemiology
Introduction:
As the U.S. population undergoes continuous shifts the population’s health profile changes dynamically resulting in more or less expression of certain psychiatric disorders and utilization of health-care resources. In this paper, we analyze national data on the psychiatric morbidity of American patients and their summated cost in different age groups.
Methods:
The latest data (2009) on the number of hospital discharges and national bill (hospital charges) linked with psychiatric disorders were extracted from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS).
Results:
National data shows that mood disorders are the largest diagnostic category in terms of percentage of psychiatri-crelated discharges in the 1 – 17 years age group. The proportion decreases gradually as age progresses while delirium, dementia, amnestic and other cognitive disorders increase exponentially after 65 years of age. Schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders as well as alcohol and substance-related disorders peak in the working age groups (18 – 64 years). From an economic point of view, mood disorders in the 18 – 44 age group has the highest national bill ($5.477 billion) followed by schizophrenic and other psychotic disorders in the same age group ($4.337 billion) and mood disorders in the 45 – 64 age group ($4.310 billion). On the third place come schizophrenic and other psychotic disorders in the 45 – 64 age group ($3.931 billion).
Conclusion:
This paper illustrates the high cost of psychiatric care in the U.S., especially the large fraction of healthcare money spent on working-age patients suffering from mood disorders. This underlines psychiatric cost-efficiency as a vital topic in the current healthcare debate.
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