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Archive for the ‘Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law’ Category

State Efforts to Promote Continuity of Coverage and Care under the Affordable Care Act

January 30, 2014 Comments off

State Efforts to Promote Continuity of Coverage and Care under the Affordable Care Act
Source: Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law

Many states have worked tirelessly over the past two years to develop health insurance exchanges and prepare for the expansion of their Medicaid programs in order to meet the requirements of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Programs to expand coverage, however, do not necessarily ensure seamlessness for many individuals who are likely to experience shifts in program eligibility due to changing circumstances (e.g., income fluctuations, family composition changes, etc.). A number of states are actively working to limit the impact of changes in program eligibility by developing policies that limit either the incidence of program eligibility changes and/or the impact those changes have on individual consumers. Various emerging state approaches take into account program history, the desire for state flexibility, and the political and operational challenges states face in developing coverage expansions that work for consumers, stakeholders, and policy makers.

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Arrests of and Forced Interventions on Pregnant Women in the United States, 1973-2005: Implications for Women’s Legal Status and Public Health

January 24, 2013 Comments off

Arrests of and Forced Interventions on Pregnant Women in the United States, 1973-2005: Implications for Women’s Legal Status and Public Health

Source: Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law

In November 2011, the citizens of Mississippi voted down Proposition 26, a “personhood” measure that sought to establish separate constitutional rights for fertilized eggs, embryos, and fetuses. This proposition raised the question of whether such measures could be used as the basis for depriving pregnant women of their liberty through arrests or forced medical interventions. Over the past four decades, descriptions of selected subsets of arrests and forced interventions on pregnant women have been published. Such cases, however, have never been systematically identified and documented, nor has the basis for their deprivations of liberty been comprehensively examined. In this article we report on 413 cases from 1973 to 2005 in which a woman’s pregnancy was a necessary factor leading to attempted and actual deprivations of a woman’s physical liberty. First, we describe key characteristics of the women and the cases, including socioeconomic status and race. Second, we investigate the legal claims made to justify the arrests, detentions, and forced interventions. Third, we explore the role played by health care providers. We conclude by discussing the implications of our findings and the likely impact of personhood measures on pregnant women’s liberty and on maternal, fetal, and child health.

See: New study examines post-Roe v. Wade arrests of and forced interventions on pregnant women (EurekAlert!)

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