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How America Pays for College 2013: A national study by Sallie Mae and Ipsos

August 19, 2013 Comments off

How America Pays for College 2013: A national study by Sallie Mae and Ipsos
Source: Sallie Mae/Ipsos

The national study by Sallie Mae, How America Pays for College 2013, conducted by Ipsos, is a compelling look at how today’s families view higher education, manage higher education costs, and tap a variety of funding sources. This year’s study finds that families are adjusting to a new post-recession reality to pay for college.

  • Higher scholarships and grants. “Free money” now pays for 30% of college costs, up from 25% four years ago.
  • Reduced parent contributions. Parents now fund from income and savings 27% of college expenses, down from 2010’s peak funding of 36%.
  • Unwavering belief in the value of college. 85% of parents strongly agreed that college was an investment in their child’s future, the highest in the last five years.
  • New cost-consciousness. A higher number of families factor college costs into the choice of school.

How America Pays for College 2013 offers important, informative insights into how families are managing to fund higher education in the current economic landscape.

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While Strongly Valuing College, Families Continue to Cut Costs, Says National Study by Sallie Mae and Ipsos

July 17, 2012 Comments off

While Strongly Valuing College, Families Continue to Cut Costs, Says National Study by Sallie Mae and Ipsos
Source: Sallie Mae

Eighty-three percent of college students and parents strongly agreed that higher education is an investment in the future, and the majority found multiple ways to cut college costs, according to a new national study from Sallie Mae and Ipsos Public Affairs.

Students now foot an expanding share of the college tuition bill, while parents scale back compared to four years ago. Drawing from savings, income, and loans, students paid 30 percent of the total cost of attendance last academic year, up from 24 percent four years earlier, while parents covered 37 percent, down from 45 percent in the same time period.

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