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Millennials and Political News Social Media – the Local TV for the Next Generation?

June 5, 2015 Comments off

Millennials and Political News Social Media – the Local TV for the Next Generation?
Source: Pew Research Center

When it comes to where younger Americans get news about politics and government, social media look to be the local TV of the Millennial generation. About six-in-ten online Millennials (61%) report getting political news on Facebook in a given week, a much larger percentage than turn to any other news source, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis. This stands in stark contrast to internet-using Baby Boomers, for whom local TV tops the list of sources for political news at nearly the same reach (60%).

At the same time, Millennials’ relatively low reliance on local TV for political news (37% see news there in a given week) almost mirrors Baby Boomers’ comparatively low reliance on Facebook (39%).

Gen Xers, who bridge the age gap between Millennials (ages 18-33 at the time of the 2014 survey) and Baby Boomers (ages 50-68), also bridge the gap between these news sources. Roughly half (51%) of online Gen Xers get political and government news on Facebook in a given week and about half (46%) do so on local TV.

Planning for financial decisions as you age

June 2, 2015 Comments off

Planning for financial decisions as you age
Source: Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

Though it’s hard to think about, as we age, sometimes we lose the ability to manage our own money and property. We often think about our financial capability, like our ability to drive, as an important measure of our independence. But planning ahead may actually help you stay in control.

Here at the CFPB, we worked with our federal partners at the Securities and Exchange Commission to create a Consumer Advisory and Investor Bulletin on planning for the future, when you may not be able to manage your money and property. This is often referred to as diminished capacity. The advisory has advice on planning for your financial future, getting your documents in order, and watching out for financial exploitation.

If age-related decline seems far in the distant future, this advisory is still a useful tool for you too, as it can help you help your parents or other loved ones. It stresses the importance of talking with them about advance planning before it’s too late. It also has good tips to help you to manage their money when the time comes.

Workforce Development in the United States: Lessons Learned for Older Workers

May 22, 2015 Comments off

Workforce Development in the United States: Lessons Learned for Older Workers
Source: AARP Public Policy Institute

This report by workforce experts Stephen A. Wandner, David E. Balducchi, and Christopher J. O’Leary undertakes a selective review of public workforce development programs in the United States over the last eighty years with a special emphasis on their importance to older Americans.

Particular attention is paid to services benefitting dislocated workers—that is, experienced adults permanently separated from their prior employers. The Employment Service and the Workforce Investment Act Dislocated Worker programs serve the greatest number of older workers.

The Senior Community Service Employment Program and the very small Alternative Trade Adjustment Assistance program (now called Reemployment Trade Adjustment Assistance) are the only programs targeted specifically to older workers.

The policy options presented in the paper go beyond changes to the public workforce system embodied in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014.

American Driving Survey: Methodology and Year One Results, May 2013 – May 2014

May 22, 2015 Comments off

American Driving Survey: Methodology and Year One Results, May 2013 – May 2014
Source: AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety/Urban Institute

On behalf of the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, the Urban Institute conducts a continuous survey to measure the driving behavior of the American public. The American Driving Survey is a national survey of persons 16 and over who drive of light vehicles (autos, SUVs, trucks) and reside in households with landline telephone service and/or cellular telephones. The survey commenced in May 2013 and is ongoing. The results of the first year’s data collection are presented in this report.

A Look at the End-of-Life Financial Situation in America

May 21, 2015 Comments off

A Look at the End-of-Life Financial Situation in America
Source: Employee Benefit Research Institute

  • This report takes a comprehensive look at the financial situation of older Americans at the end of their lives. In particular, it documents the percentage of households with a member who recently died with few or no assets. It also documents the income, debt, home-ownership rates, net home equity, and dependency on Social Security for households that experienced a recent death.
  • Significant findings include that among all those who died at ages 85 or above, 20.6 percent had no non-housing assets and 12.2 percent had no assets left. Among singles who died at or above age 85, 24.6 percent had no non-housing assets left and 16.7 percent had no assets left.
  • Data show those who died at earlier ages were generally worse off financially: 29.8 percent of households that lost a member between ages 50 and 64 had no assets left. Households with at least one member who died earlier also had significantly lower income than households with all surviving members.
  • The report shows that among singles who died at ages 85 or above, 9.1 percent had outstanding debt (other than mortgage debt) and the average debt amount for them was $6,368.
  • The report also shows that the importance of Social Security to older households cannot be overstated. For recently deceased singles, it provided at least two-thirds of their household income. Couple households above 75 with deceased members received more than 60 percent of their household income from Social Security.

Trends in Social Security Claiming

May 21, 2015 Comments off

Trends in Social Security Claiming
Source: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College

The brief’s key findings are:

  • Over the past 25 years, the average retirement age for U.S. workers has been rising, a trend that should align with when people first claim Social Security.
  • But the percentage of all initial claimants who are age 62 shows little change until recently.
  • A better metric to capture claiming behavior over time – when the population is aging – is the percentage of workers turning age 62 who claim at 62.
  • This measure, based on unpublished Social Security data, shows a steep decline in claiming at 62 since the mid-1990s: from 56 percent to 36 percent for men.
  • In short, while more than a third of workers still claim right away, a growing number are waiting until their mid-60s or later.

Retirement Throughout the Ages: Expectations and Preparations of American Workers

May 21, 2015 Comments off

Retirement Throughout the Ages: Expectations and Preparations of American Workers
Source: Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies

The 16th Annual Transamerica Retirement Survey finds American workers are continuing to recover from the Great Recession and its aftereffects. While the economy is recovering, the U.S. retirement landscape is also continuing to evolve, with increases in life expectancies, the need for Social Security reform, and an even greater need for individuals and families to plan and save for their future financial security. Most workers are rising to the challenge by savings, but are they saving enough? Are they properly planning?

Workers of all ages face opportunities and challenges for improving their retirement outlook. As we progress through our working lives, our circumstances change over time with age. While workers in their twenties are embarking on their careers with decades to plan and save, retirement for workers in their fifties and sixties is much closer on the horizon, with many needing to shore up the size of their nest eggs.

This study examines workers in their twenties, thirties, forties, fifties, and sixties and older to compare and contrast their retirement preparations and shed light on how they can navigate the future and improve their retirement outlook.

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