Archive

Archive for the ‘crime’ Category

Australian crime: Facts & figures: 2013

September 24, 2014 Comments off

Australian crime: Facts & figures: 2013
Source: Australian Institute of Criminology

Australian Crime: Facts & Figures uses information compiled from a broad range of sources to create an accurate and holistic picture of crime and criminal justice issues in Australia. Within this volume are the patterns and trends relating to specific crimes, victims, offenders, the location of criminal acts and the operation and cost of the criminal justice system (including the police, courts and prisons).

About these ads

Immigration Enforcement and Crime Control: A Study of Secure Communities

September 24, 2014 Comments off

Immigration Enforcement and Crime Control: A Study of Secure Communities
Source: New York University School of Law

Does immigration enforcement actually reduce crime? Surprisingly, little evidence exists either way—despite the fact that deporting noncitizens who commit crimes has been a central feature of American immigration law since the early twentieth century. We capitalize on a natural policy experiment to address the question and, in the process, provide the first empirical analysis of the most important deportation initiative to be rolled out in decades. The policy initiative we study is “Secure Communities,” a program designed to enable the federal government to check the immigration status of every person arrested for a crime by local police. Before this program, the government checked the immigration status of only a small fraction of arrestees. Since its launch, the program has led to over a quarter of a million detentions. We exploit the slow rollout of the program across more than 3,000 US counties to isolate the effect of Secure Communities on local crime rates. Moreover, we refine those estimates using rich data on the number of immigrants detained under the program in each county and month—data obtained from the federal government through extensive FOIA requests. Our results show that Secure Communities led to no meaningful reductions in the FBI index crime rate. Nor has it reduced rates of violent crime—homicides, rape, robbery, or aggravated assault. This evidence shows that the program has not served its central objective of making communities safer.

HHS OIG — Health Insurance Marketplaces Generally Protected Personally Identifiable Information but Could Improve Certain Information Security Controls

September 24, 2014 Comments off

Health Insurance Marketplaces Generally Protected Personally Identifiable Information but Could Improve Certain Information Security Controls
Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General

This summary report provides an overview of the results of three reviews of the security of certain information technology at the Federal, Kentucky, and New Mexico Health Insurance Marketplaces. These reviews generally examined whether information security controls were implemented in accordance with relevant Federal requirements and guidelines and whether vulnerabilities identified by prior assessments were remediated in a timely manner.

Although CMS had implemented controls to secure Healthcare.gov and consumer personally identifiable information (PII) on the Federal Marketplace, we identified areas for improvement in its information security controls. Kentucky had sufficiently protected PII on its Marketplace Web sites and databases in accordance with Federal requirements. However, opportunities to improve the Kentucky Marketplace’s database access and information security controls remain. Although New Mexico management had implemented security controls, policies, and procedures to prevent vulnerabilities in its Web site, database, and supporting information systems, its information technology policies and procedures did not always conform to Federal requirements to secure sensitive information stored and processed by the New Mexico Marketplace.

We recommended that the Marketplaces’ management address the findings identified in its reports.

On September 4, 2014, CMS issued a statement regarding an intrusion on a server that supports testing of Healthcare.gov but does not contain consumer personal information. The intrusion occurred after the period of our audit and involved technology outside our audit scope.

AU — Risky facilities: Analysis of crime concentration in high-rise buildings

September 23, 2014 Comments off

Risky facilities: Analysis of crime concentration in high-rise buildings
Source: Australian Institute of Criminology

Current town planning and housing policies suggest that in the very near future, housing density in major Australian cities will be much higher than current levels. To date, little attention has been paid to how these policy shifts will impact levels of crime and fear of crime. The aim of this research is to contribute to the development of strategic policy for the secure management of high-density housing. By analysing actual rates and types of crime, guardianship levels, building management styles and perceptions of fear of crime, the research will reveal how planning policies and high-rise building management styles can coalesce to create safer vertical communities. The research focuses on high-rise apartments and touristic buildings on the Gold Coast (specifically Surfers Paradise) and identifies the disproportionate concentration of crimes among a handful of buildings. Results may help state and local governments in Australia to avoid repeating the housing policy mistakes experienced by other countries.

Cyber-attacks: Effects on UK

September 23, 2014 Comments off

Cyber-attacks: Effects on UK
Source: Oxford Economics

The UK Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure (CPNI) requested Oxford Economics to carry out a study of the impact of state-sponsored cyber-attacks on UK firms. The study consists of the elaboration of an economic framework for cyber-attacks, a survey of UK firms on cyber-attacks, an event study on the impact of cyber-attacks on stock market valuations, and a series of case studies illustrating the experience of several UK firms with cyber-attacks.

Free registration required.

How Much Crime is Drug-Related? History, Limitations, and Potential Improvements of Estimation Methods

September 22, 2014 Comments off

How Much Crime is Drug-Related? History, Limitations, and Potential Improvements of Estimation Methods (PDF)
Source: National Criminal Justice Reference Service
From NCJRS abstract:

Goldstein’s model of drug-related crime identifies three categories of DAFs: “economic-compulsive” (crimes committed to obtain money for buying drugs); “psychopharmacological” crime (crimes committed due to the effect of drugs, such as assaults and homicides); and “systemic” crime (crimes committed by individuals and organizations in the course of operating a drug-trafficking enterprise). In addition to these three categories of DAFs, this paper proposes four additional types of DAFs indirectly related to drug supply and demand. Although these drug-related harmful effects may not involve specific law violations, they constitute part of the cost of drug supply and consumption. One of the four additional drug-related costs to society is the diminishment of positive contributions to society the drug-user might have provided had he/she not become dependent on drugs. A second indirect effect pertains to the adverse impacts the drug-user has on his/her children and other family members because of drug dependence. A third indirect effect is the impact of drug market activities on the neighborhood environment and constructive influence. The fourth indirect cost of drug use is the general diminishment of the informal ability of a society to mold the moral development of its members and thus deter crime. 3 figures and 53 references

Analysis of Recent Mass Shootings, 2014

September 22, 2014 Comments off

Analysis of Recent Mass Shootings, 2014
Source: Everytown for Gun Safety

Using FBI data and media reports, Everytown for Gun Safety developed an analysis of mass shootings that took place between January 2009 and July 2014. The analysis found that there have been at least 110 mass shootings in this five and a half-year period.
The FBI defines a “mass shooting” as any incident where at least four people were murdered with a gun. Below are some of the report’s more surprising findings:

  • Mass shootings represent a small share of total US firearm homicides.
  • There is a strong connection between mass shooting incidents and domestic or family violence: at least 57% of mass shootings surveyed were related to domestic or family violence.
  • Perpetrators of mass shootings are generally older than perpetrators of gun violence in the US as a whole. While the median age of known overall gun murderers in the U.S. is 26, the median age of perpetrators of mass shootings was 34.
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 929 other followers