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The Year of the Drone: An Analysis of U.S. Drone Strikes in Pakistan, 2004-2013

February 15, 2013

The Year of the Drone: An Analysis of U.S. Drone Strikes in Pakistan, 2004-2013
Source: New America Foundation

The purpose of this database is to provide as much information as possible about the covert U.S. drone program in Pakistan in the absence of any such transparency on the part of the American government. This data was collected from credible news reports and is presented here with the relevant sources. You can read more about our methodology here.

This database was originally published in February 2010 by Katherine Tiedemann, then a Policy Analyst at the New America Foundation, and was later added to by Andrew Lebovich, then a Program Associate at the New America Foundation, both working with Peter Bergen, director of New America’s National Security Studies Program.

That database underwent a comprehensive review in the summer of 2012. As part of this process we established an updated methodology for counting strikes and deaths, incorporated additional news reports about the drone strikes, and presented the data in a revised format for greater clarity.

This review was undertaken by Meg Braun, a Rhodes Scholar working towards her MPhil in International Relations at St. John’s College at Oxford University, Fatima Mustafa, a Pakistani PhD candidate in Political Science at Boston University, Farhad Peikar, an Afghan journalist and masters student at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Public Policy, and Jennifer Rowland, a Program Associate with the New America Foundation working together with Peter Bergen. We are also grateful to the Bureau of Investigative Journalism for their work on this topic.

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