Archive

Archive for the ‘climate change’ Category

EPA’s Clean Power Plan Proposal: Are the Emission Rate Targets Front-Loaded?, CRS Insights (November 3, 2014)

November 18, 2014 Comments off

EPA’s Clean Power Plan Proposal: Are the Emission Rate Targets Front-Loaded?, CRS Insights (PDF)
Source: Congressional Research Service (via Federation of American Scientists)

On June 18, 2014, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed regulations (the “Clean Power Plan”) addressing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from existing fossil fuel-fired electric generating units. Carbon dioxide is the primary human-related greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change, and these electric generating units, as a group, account for the largest source of CO2 emissions in the United States.

The proposal would establish state-specific CO2 emission rate targets measured in pounds of CO2 emissions per megawatt-hour (MWh) of electricity generation. The targets include both a 2030 goal and an interim goal to be achieved “on average” between 2020 and 2029. States would prepare and submit to EPA implementation plans describing the state-specific activities that would achieve the emission rate targets.

Assuming the proposal becomes a final rule in June 2015, states would then have until June 30, 2016, to submit their implementation plans. However, states could request an additional year for submission of a complete plan, provided that they have taken “meaningful steps” toward completion by the 2016 deadline. Alternatively, states participating in a multistate plan would have until June 30, 2018, to submit a plan.

About these ads

Agricultural stakeholder views on climate change: Implications for conducting research and outreach

November 15, 2014 Comments off

Agricultural stakeholder views on climate change: Implications for conducting research and outreach (PDF)
Source: Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Understanding U.S. agricultural stakeholder views about the existence of climate change and its causes is central to developing interventions in support of adaptation and mitigation. Results from surveys conducted with six Midwestern stakeholder groups (corn producers, agricultural advisors, climatologists, Extension educators, and two different cross-disciplinary teams of scientists funded by USDA-NIFA) reveal striking differences. Individuals representing these groups were asked in 2011-2012 to “select the statement that best reflects your beliefs about climate change.” Three of five answer options included the notion that climate change is occurring but for different reasons (mostly human activities; mostly natural; more or less equally by natural and human activities). The last two options were “there is not sufficient evidence to know with certainty whether climate change is occurring or not” and “climate change is not occurring.” Results reveal that agricultural and climate scientists are more likely to believe that 30 climate change is mostly due to human activities (50 to 67%) than farmers and advisors (8 – 12%). Almost a quarter of farmers and agricultural advisors believe the source of climate change is mostly natural causes; and 22-31% state there is not sufficient evidence to know with certainty whether it is occurring or not. This discrepancy in beliefs creates challenges for communicating climate science to agricultural stakeholders in ways that encourage adaptation and mitigation. Results suggest that engagement strategies that reduce threats to worldviews and increase public 36 dialogue could make climate information more relevant to stakeholder groups with different belief structures.

Concluding instalment of the Fifth Assessment Report: Climate change threatens irreversible and dangerous impacts, but options exist to limit its effects

November 3, 2014 Comments off

Concluding instalment of the Fifth Assessment Report: Climate change threatens irreversible and dangerous impacts, but options exist to limit its effects (PDF)
Source: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

Human influence on the climate system is clear and growing, with impacts observed on all continents. If left unchecked, climate change will increase the likelihood of severe, pervasive and irreversible impacts for people and ecosystems. However, options are available to adapt to climate change and implementing stringent mitigations activities can ensure that the impacts of climate change remain within a manageable range, creating a brighter and more sustainable future.

These are among the key findings of the Synthesis Report released by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) on Sunday. The Synthesis Report distils and integrates the findings of the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report produced by over 800 scientists and released over the past 13 months – the most comprehensive assessment of climate change ever undertaken.

+ Climate Change 2014 Synthesis Report (PDF)

Climatescope 2014

October 30, 2014 Comments off

Climatescope 2014
Source: Bloomberg New Energy Finance, Inter-American Development Bank Group, U.K. Government Department for International Development, U.S. Agency for International Development

The Climatescope is a unique country-by-country assessment, interactive report and index that evaluates the investment climate for climate-related investment worldwide.

It profiles 55 countries worldwide and evaluates their ability to attract capital for low-carbon energy sources while building a greener economy.

The Climatescope is a snapshot of where clean energy policy and finance stand today, and a guide to where clean energy can go tomorrow.

This marks the third year of the Climatescope project. In 2012 and 2013, the Climatescope focused exclusively on Latin America and the Caribbean. The first edition was developed by the Multilateral Investment Fund of the Inter-American Development Bank Group in partnership with Bloomberg New Energy Finance.

In 2014, the UK Department for International Development and the US Agency for International Development have joined as supporters and advisors. The project has been expanded to include 55 countries, states, and provinces in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. Bloomberg New Energy Finance serves as research partner and author of the report.

Climate Change, Heat Stress, and U.S. Dairy Production

October 30, 2014 Comments off

Climate Change, Heat Stress, and U.S. Dairy Production
Source: USDA Economic Research Service

In the United States, climate change is likely to increase average daily temperatures and the frequency of heat waves. Dairy cows are particularly sensitive to heat stress, and the dairy sector has been estimated to bear over half of the costs of current heat stress to the livestock industry. Greater heat stress may lower U.S. milk production 0.6-1.3 percent by 2030.

Weather-driven energy intensity increase led to higher energy-related emissions in 2013

October 23, 2014 Comments off

Weather-driven energy intensity increase led to higher energy-related emissions in 2013
Source: Energy Information Administration

U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions increased in 2013 by 129 million metric tons (2.5%), the largest increase since 2010 and the fourth-largest increase since 1990. Emissions trends reflect a combination of economic factors (population multiplied by per capita output [GDP/population]), energy intensity (energy use per dollar of GDP), and carbon intensity (carbon emissions per unit of energy consumed).

In the decade prior to 2013, energy intensity decreased on average by 2.0% per year; given that it increased by 0.5% in 2013, this meant there was a 2.5% swing compared to trend. Energy intensity changes can reflect weather variations that directly affect energy use for heating and cooling as well as changes in the composition of economic activity. Heating degree days, a measure of heating requirements, increased about 19% between 2012 and 2013. As compared to the 2003-12 trend, the increase in energy intensity added about 134 million metric tons.

Who Pollutes? A Household-Level Database of America’s Greenhouse Gas Footprint

October 23, 2014 Comments off

Who Pollutes? A Household-Level Database of America’s Greenhouse Gas Footprint
Source: Center for Global Development

This paper describes the creation of a database providing estimated greenhouse gas (GHG) footprints for 6 million US households over the period 2008-2012. The database allows analysis of footprints for 52 types of consumption (e.g. electricity, gasoline, apparel, beef, air travel, etc.) within and across geographic regions as small as individual census tracts.

Potential research applications with respect to carbon pricing and tax policy are discussed. Preliminary analysis reveals:

  • The top 10% of US polluters are responsible for 25% of the country’s GHG footprint. The least-polluting 40% of the population accounts for only 20% of the total. The average GHG footprint of individuals in the top 2% of the income distribution is more than four times that of those in the bottom quintile.
  • The highest GHG footprints are found in America’s suburbs, where relatively inefficient housing and transport converge with higher incomes. Rural areas exhibit moderate GHG footprints. High-density urban areas generally exhibit the lowest GHG footprints, but location-specific results are highly dependent on income.
  • Residents of Republican-held congressional districts have slightly higher average GHG footprints than those in Democratic districts – but the difference is small (21.8 tCO2e/person/year in Republican districts; 20.6 in Democratic). There is little relationship between the strength of a district’s party affiliation and average GHG footprint.
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 986 other followers