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Sacramento Tops Large Counties in Employment Growth Rate

May 1, 2015 Comments off

Sacramento Tops Large Counties in Employment Growth Rate
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Among the 50 largest counties with the most employees, Sacramento, Calif., had the highest rate of employment growth among all sectors between 2012 and 2013 (up 5.5 percent to 428,475), according to new U.S. Census Bureau statistics released today. Sacramento was followed by two Texas counties: Travis (up 4.9 percent to 514,749) and Harris (up 4.7 percent to 2.0 million). Annual payroll in Sacramento rose 9.9 percent to $20.9 billion for the same period.

Delaware led all states in rate of employment growth between 2012 and 2013 with employment levels climbing 5.1 percent to 382,128, followed by Washington (up 3.5 percent to 2.4 million) and California (a 3.5 percent increase to 13.4 million). Payroll in Delaware increased 6.7 percent to $19.5 billion.

Nationally, employment in the information sector (NAICS 51) of the nation’s economy rose 4.1 percent between 2012 and 2013 to 3.3 million, besting every other sector in rate of growth. The sector also saw its payroll rise 7.0 percent to $273.3 billion and its payroll per employee climb 2.8 percent to $83,677.

Realizing the Potential of the American Community Survey: Challenges, Tradeoffs, and Opportunities

April 29, 2015 Comments off

Realizing the Potential of the American Community Survey: Challenges, Tradeoffs, and Opportunities
Source: National Research Council

The American Community Survey (ACS) was conceptualized as a replacement to the census long form, which collected detailed population and housing data from a sample of the U.S. population, once a decade, as part of the decennial census operations. The long form was traditionally the main source of socio-economic information for areas below the national level. The data provided for small areas, such as counties, municipalities, and neighborhoods is what made the long form unique, and what makes the ACS unique today. Since the successful transition from the decennial long form in 2005, the ACS has become an invaluable resource for many stakeholders, particularly for meeting national and state level data needs. However, due to inadequate sample sizes, a major challenge for the survey is producing reliable estimates for smaller geographic areas, which is a concern because of the unique role fulfilled by the long form, and now the ACS, of providing data with a geographic granularity that no other federal survey could provide. In addition to the primary challenge associated with the reliability of the estimates, this is also a good time to assess other aspects of the survey in order to identify opportunities for refinement based on the experience of the first few years.

Realizing the Potential of the American Community Survey provides input on ways of improving the ACS, focusing on two priority areas: identifying methods that could improve the quality of the data available for small areas, and suggesting changes that would increase the survey’s efficiency in responding to new data needs. This report considers changes that the ACS office should consider over the course of the next few years in order to further improve the ACS data. The recommendations of Realizing the Potential of the American Community Survey will help the Census Bureau improve performance in several areas, which may ultimately lead to improved data products as the survey enters its next decade.

2012 Economic Census Geographic Area Series: First Release of Data for Transportation and Warehousing Sector

April 20, 2015 Comments off

2012 Economic Census Geographic Area Series: First Release of Data for Transportation and Warehousing Sector
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

This is a series of national-, state-, county-, place- and metro area-level data files providing statistics on the number of establishments, receipts or revenue, payroll, number of employees and other items by industry. The first data were released today for the transportation and warehousing sector and includes statistics for industries such as air, rail and water transportation, as well as warehousing and storage. Covers Colorado, Hawaii and geographic areas therein only. Statistics for the other states and geographic entities within them for this sector will be released on a flow basis over the coming months.

Facts for Features — Earth Day: April 22, 2015

April 10, 2015 Comments off

Facts for Features — Earth Day: April 22, 2015
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

April 22, 2015, marks the 45th anniversary of Earth Day ― a day intended to inspire awareness and appreciation for the Earth’s natural environment. The day came from reaction to a massive oil spill in waters near Santa Barbara, Calif., in 1969. In honor of Earth Day ― and Earth Week (April 16-22) ― this edition of Profile America Facts for Features includes examples of Census Bureau statistics pertaining to energy and the environment.

Census Bureau Report Examines Population Changes in U.S. Island Areas Over Last Decade

April 9, 2015 Comments off

Census Bureau Report Examines Population Changes in U.S. Island Areas Over Last Decade
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Among U.S. Island Areas, only the U.S. Virgin Islands had a higher median age than the U.S. mainland at 39.2 years in 2010. A new report, Recent Population Trends for the U.S. Island Areas: 2000 to 2010, examines demographic trends, such as median age, for American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

American Samoa’s median age of 22.4 years was nearly 17 years younger than the Virgin Islands and about 15 years younger than the U.S. median age of 37.2 years. Additionally, Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands also had younger median ages at 29.5 and 33.4 years, respectively. This pattern of median ages among the Island Areas reflects their different migration and fertility rate histories.

Census Bureau Releases Updated Tables on Fertility

April 8, 2015 Comments off

Census Bureau Releases Updated Tables on Fertility
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

The U.S. Census Bureau released new tables and figures today using the 2014 Current Population Survey’s Fertility Supplement, which includes fertility and relationship data for women age 15 to 50. The tables include information on children ever born, rates of childlessness, and relationship status at first birth for women with selected demographic characteristics. In addition, the tables and figures show historical trends in fertility.

Highlights include:

  • Just under 60 percent of the roughly 75 million women age 15 to 50 in 2014 were mothers and had given birth to about 95 million children.
  • About one in five women whose first birth occurred between January 2000 and June 2014 were cohabiting at the time of that first birth.
  • Women age 40 to 50 in 2014 who were in managerial or professional occupations were more likely to be childless than women of similar age in other occupations.
  • The number of women age 40 to 44 who had only one child roughly doubled between 1976 and 2014.
  • The percent of women who were 44 to 50 and childless is not different from the percent of women who were 40 to 44 and childless, suggesting that women who are childless at age 40 are unlikely to give birth later.
  • Among women age 20 to 50, those in the Northeast had fewer children per 1,000 women than did those in the South, Midwest or West.

U.S. Commerce Department Announces Digital Millennium Copyright Act Multistakeholder Forum Results

April 8, 2015 Comments off

U.S. Commerce Department Announces Digital Millennium Copyright Act Multistakeholder Forum Results
Source: U.S. Department of Commerce

The U.S. Department of Commerce’s Internet Policy Task Force, through the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) and National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), today released a document developed by stakeholders containing a set of agreed upon practices aimed at improving the operation of the notice and takedown system under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA).

The document known as DMCA Notice-and-Takedown Processes: List of Good, Bad and Situational Practices was developed by the participants in the multistakeholder forum established as a result of the Commerce Department’s Green Paper on Copyright Policy, Creativity, and Innovation in the Digital Economy, released in 2013. The document identifies a number of “good”, “bad” and “situational” practices to improve the efficiency of the handling and processing of DMCA notices by both senders and recipients.

The goal of the multistakeholder forum was to identify best practices and/or produce voluntary agreements for improving the operation of the DMCA notice and takedown system without the need for legislative change.

A broad range of issues were considered and discussed intensively over the course of the process, with the participants ultimately reaching consensus on those practices addressed in the final document.

The DMCA Notice-and-Takedown Processes: List of Good, Bad and Situational Practices can be found on the USPTO’s website and on NTIA’s website.

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